DAPPER DAY + PUBLIC Giveaway Winner

May 9th, 2016

In honor of our first-ever PUBLIC SoCal store that opened earlier this year at 2714 Main Street in Santa Monica, we partnered with DAPPER DAY to give away a very special custom DAPPER DAY + PUBLIC Bike. And we’re happier than the happiest place on earth to announce that the winner of the DAPPER DAY x… Read more »

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In honor of our first-ever PUBLIC SoCal store that opened earlier this year at 2714 Main Street in Santa Monica, we partnered with DAPPER DAY to give away a very special custom DAPPER DAY + PUBLIC Bike.

And we’re happier than the happiest place on earth to announce that the winner of the DAPPER DAY x PUBLIC Bikes Giveaway Contest is Alejandra from Los Angeles.

Alejandra says she “couldn’t be more excited” about her new bike. She used to spend her Sunday afternoons in college “biking down to Dockweiler Beach, exploring Manhattan Beach, making my way over to Hermosa Beach and Redondo Beach, and enjoying the sunshine on my way back home.” And now with this new PUBLIC bike, she’ll be able to fill her Sunday afternoons with beach bound rides again.

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Some of Alejandra’s hobbies include sewing and crafting, and she loves dressing in vintage-inspired wear. We think her new Dapper Day + PUBLIC bike will compliment her vintage-style quite perfectly.

DAPPER DAY is a very big deal in her life. She says about the Dapper Day Expo held at Disneyland, “it brings so much creativity to a place rich in history and culture. Everyone is dressed ever-so sharp and sophisticated that it just leaves you in awe.”

Big thanks to all who entered and sign up for our e-newsletter to hear about our next giveaway!

How to Bike with Kids on Mother’s Day—and Beyond

April 30th, 2016

On Mother’s Day, there are countless reasons our moms deserve handwritten cards and brunch. For some of us, those reasons include our fond memories of learning to ride a bike. Our mothers patiently guided us as we graduated from child bike seat to balance bike to kid bike with pedals. Just by watching Mom pedal around town… Read more »

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how to bike with kids child bicycle

On Mother’s Day, there are countless reasons our moms deserve handwritten cards and brunch. For some of us, those reasons include our fond memories of learning to ride a bike. Our mothers patiently guided us as we graduated from child bike seat to balance bike to kid bike with pedals. Just by watching Mom pedal around town herself, some of us learned to value biking for its exercise, convenience and fun factor.

For all those new mothers hoping to shape their children into cyclists, we salute you. Our figurative flowers for you include tips for teaching your kids the rituals of biking. Aside from the obvious habits that apply to all ages—wear a helmet, use hand signals, bike on the right side of the road—these pointers are kid specific.

With this advice, you’ll help your child safely grow from a bike-seat sidekick to a velodrome champion—well, if that’s what they want to be when they grow up. You can also read riding tips we collected from some of our favorite bike-riding Moms.

how to bike with kids child bicycle

The bike seat years: One-year-old to toddler

  • Before you start adventuring around town with your baby in a bike seat, your child should be one year old. They should be able to hold up their own head with a helmet on and not slump over in the bike seat, according to bikeportland.org.
    Choose a comfortable child seat with a sturdy harness. Once the child is old enough to unbuckle things, make sure they know not to escape from their harness mid-ride!
  • Start small and bike on quiet streets for short rides so that both you and your baby get comfortable.
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  • In addition to putting a helmet on your baby, always wear your own helmet to role model safe biking behavior!
  • This tip comes from the blog of PUBLIC C7 rider Joanna Goddard (past interview here): “If you have one young child, I would definitely recommend a front seat. You feel close and connected, since you can easily chat and point at things and see what they’re looking at. Plus, I find that having that extra weight in the front versus the back of the bike is easier for balancing.”
how to bike with kids child bicycle

The balance bike to training wheels years: Three- to seven-years-old or older

  • Consider a balance bike or push bike. A balance bike has no pedals and helps children focus on first learning to balance on two wheels. Once they have mastered the art of balancing they might be able to skip a pedal kids bike with training wheels all together.
  • After a balance bike, if possible, try to encourage your child to try a pedal kids bike without training wheels. By learning to ride without training wheels, your child will learn balance speed. Keep the seat low so your child can put both feet on the ground. Sometimes it’s easier to start on a gentle slope to get the pedal kids bike moving for balancing and then your child can start pedaling.
  • If your child does not have a lot of riding confidence, a pedal kids bike with training wheels is an option. Training wheels don’t help a child learn the importance of balance speed but they can help a less confident rider get going. All of PUBLIC’s smaller 16″ wheel size pedal kids bikes come with optional training wheels. It might sound contrary, but positioning the training wheels a little higher off the ground than you think will actually create more stability for the child when rolling, says PUBLIC product manager, Aaron Glick.
how to bike with kids child bicycle
  • Even though your child is low to the ground, buy your little biker a normal bicycle helmet, labeled with a certification by the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
  • Only let your child explore quiet, safe places—away from dangers such as cars and swimming pools.
how to bike with kids child bicycle

The bicycle years: Seven-years-old and beyond

  • Allow your children to graduate from a training wheels only once they’ve gained the necessary sense of balance, usually around five to seven years old.
  • Kids at 10-years-old and younger are safer riding on the sidewalk than on the street, according to Safe Kids.
  • Teach your young cyclist to make eye contact with drivers before crossing an intersection. They should make sure that the driver sees them and is going to stop.
  • Try a bike-to-school route! One adult could potentially lead the way, picking up children along the path to school to join the caravan.
  • Ditch the tandem bike. Children should be able to match your pedalling power before they tandem bike, which might take until they reach age 12, according to Outside Online.
  • For long journeys, consider a trailercycle, advises cyclist Charles Scott. You can store your supplies as well as resting children in your trailer. Once they’re ready, kids can get back on the bike and feel like part of the team.

Once your kids start pedaling, they might know their way around their neighborhood better than those kids who are only driven around in cars, at least one study has shown. The study also indicated that cycling kids have a richer connection with their community; they remember more spaces where they like to play than exclusively car-driven kids.

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In that case, what better way to celebrate Mother’s Day than pedaling around your neighborhood together? You’ll give yourself the gift of fun and exercise—and your children the gift of a more memorable childhood.

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Photography credit goes to the talents of Jetkat Photography. Model credit goes to the beautiful family of Copy Cat Chic. And big thanks to Rebecca Huval for making this post possible.

The Cars Are Jealous Of This Colorful Bike Corral Mural

April 13th, 2016

We’re all about making the world a more sustainable and healthier place through thoughtful urban design and sustainable transportation. So we got a special kick out of a recent public project in San Francisco that transformed a single car parking spot on the corner of Fell and Divisadero into a bike parking corral for 12 bikes… Read more »

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We’re all about making the world a more sustainable and healthier place through thoughtful urban design and sustainable transportation. So we got a special kick out of a recent public project in San Francisco that transformed a single car parking spot on the corner of Fell and Divisadero into a bike parking corral for 12 bikes with a vibrant, colorful street mural underfoot.

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Eric Tuvel in the bike corral.

We caught up with the mastermind behind this bike corral mural, Eric Tuvel (pictured above). Read on for more about Eric, how this project came about, and how you can implement a bike corral mural in your city.

PUBLIC: You’re both a visual designer and a bicycle advocate? Tell us more about your background.
Eric: My background in Graphic Design started in undergrad, which is where I started commuting by bike to class and to get around campus. As I pursued my master’s degree in City & Regional Planning, I began applying my design background to cities and commuting by bike became more about shaping how people move around the city. Before joining the SFMTA (San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency) as a Transportation Planner in the Sustainable Streets division, I was the Design and Program Manager at the SF Bicycle Coalition. It was there I got more involved in advocacy and the biking community of San Francisco and fused my design/planning background with my love for biking.

PUBLIC: What was the inspiration behind this bike corral mural concept?
Eric: In my first position at the SFMTA I managed the bicycle parking program. As I started siting and surveying for sidewalk racks and on-street corrals, I started to see the various ways people tried to bring art into these bike parking facilities. Talking with my coworker one day, the idea just hit us and we thought, “What about painting a mural underneath the corral on the street?” It was really serendipitous.
Once the idea was planted in my head, I was determined.
I started running it by staff at various city agencies to get the approvals I needed. As for the mural that was installed, it was done by Bay Area artist Kristin Farr. She selected colors from the streetscape at the location to come up with the palette for the piece. She was selected by the sponsor, Madrone Art Bar, and was great to work with on the project. The piece is titled “Diamonds on Divis”.

PUBLIC: What were the major challenges to getting this bike corral mural implemented?
Eric: The major challenge was creating a process for something that hasn’t been done before. The main thing I did was talk to as many people as I could and loop in all the city departments and stakeholders I could think of. It’s a really positive project so overall everyone was supportive but there were some small concerns we were able to work through and got everyone on board. The other unforeseen challenge was the weather! Scheduling a time to paint was a little tricky with the recent fits and starts of rain we’ve had.

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Image courtesy of SFMTA.

PUBLIC: How is this project funded?
Eric: “Diamonds on Divis” was funded privately by the Madrone Art Bar. They applied for a corral in 2015 and we approved the location. When I came up with the idea, I thought Madrone was the perfect partner for the first one as the corral wasn’t installed yet and Madone is an art bar. I brought the idea to Michael Krouse, the owner, and he was on board right away. I feel lucky that we had a partner that was so easy to work with and was supportive from the beginning.

PUBLIC: If you’re an art and bicycle enthusiast outside of San Francisco, what should this person do to replicate a bike corral mural in another city?
Eric: First, learn more about what the city process is for something like this. Start with the department that installs bike parking in the city. The process might not be clear, but be persistent and keep talking to folks. Don’t be discouraged by how long it might take because the results are worth the work.

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PUBLIC: What’s next to expand this concept to other parts of San Francisco?
Eric: The next steps would be to evaluate the current bike corral mural, or “bikelet” as I’ve been calling it, over the next few months, primarily to see how it holds up to the elements. We are definitely interested in expanding the program and partnering with other organizations. We encourage interested organizations to contact us and we will be looking into proactively outreaching to businesses that are applying for or already have bicycle corrals. If people are interested they can contact Bikeparking@sfmta.com.

April Rider Profile: Darcy From Fayetteville

April 7th, 2016

Through insightful Facebook comments, glittering Instagram snapshots and daily social media chatter, our PUBLIC community never ceases to inspire. So we thought we’d start a monthly series highlighting an image shared on social media by a PUBLIC rider that caught our eye, and learning a little more about the rider behind the shot. This month it’s Darcy… Read more »

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public rider profile
Through insightful Facebook comments, glittering Instagram snapshots and daily social media chatter, our PUBLIC community never ceases to inspire. So we thought we’d start a monthly series highlighting an image shared on social media by a PUBLIC rider that caught our eye, and learning a little more about the rider behind the shot.

This month it’s Darcy from Fayetteville, AR. She took the photo above of her Slate Blue PUBLIC V7 and we can’t think of a better way to sum up Spring.

Darcy writes about her hometown of Fayetteville…

“Fayetteville is home to a city bike trail called the Razorback Regional Greenway. It’s a 36 mile, mostly off road, paved trail that stretches from South Fayetteville up to Bella Vista. It connects riders to many city attractions and hot spots all over NWA. I love to take my PUBLIC V7 out on the trails on Sunday afternoon—riding and stopping along the way for a coffee or even some shopping. It’s definitely a favorite way to spend an afternoon.”

And she describes the inspiration behind the photo…

“On the day I took this photo it was finally starting to get warm and I was excited to take my camera out for some photos of some fresh blooms I had been seeing around town. I am a blogger (Helloluvvy.com) and taking my bike out to explore and take photos is something I do regularly. This tree, not far from my home, was absolutely amazing. I took lots of pictures of it for the blog and since I think my PUBLIC V7 is also amazing I added it in the photo.”

Thanks for sharing your story, Darcy. We look forward to highlighting next month’s inspiring rider!

Celebrating The Green Bike Lane

March 15th, 2016

Written By Rebecca Huval On the upcoming holiday celebrating all things Irish and green, we should also pause to celebrate the green bike lane. These ribbons of color do more than brighten up an otherwise dull road—they give cyclists a sense of safety, create clarity for drivers, and announce to everyone on the road that… Read more »

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Written By Rebecca Huval

celebrating green bike lanes

Green on green in Vancouver, Canada.

On the upcoming holiday celebrating all things Irish and green, we should also pause to celebrate the green bike lane. These ribbons of color do more than brighten up an otherwise dull road—they give cyclists a sense of safety, create clarity for drivers, and announce to everyone on the road that bikes belong there. We’ve written about various colors in public spaces, including green bike lanes, in our past blog post “Rolling out the Green Carpet in San Francisco.”

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Green bike lanes in Portland, Oregon. Image By Steve Morgan

In the past decade or so, these highly visible routes have rolled out in the United States, from Salt Lake City to Los Angeles. Portland was a leader in the early days, implementing green lanes at a time when there were no clear federal guidelines on bike lane colors. Then, in 2011, the US Department of Transportation officially approved green to mark bike lanes. It was chosen because of its visibility.

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Green bike lanes in Santa Monica, California.

That, and because all the others were taken—blue for handicapped spots, even purple for specific toll plaza approach lanes. Now, as one California city’s website explains, “Bright green painted bike lanes are sweeping the nation, and Santa Monica is no exception.”

Celebrating Green Bike lanes

Blue bike lanes in Denmark. Image via Wikimedia.

We in the United States aren’t the first to paint our bike lanes, but we have claimed green as our own. Starting in the early 1980s, Copenhagen painted blue strips to mark the safe zone for cyclists to cross an intersection. On the other side of the spectrum, bike lanes are often red in Amsterdam and even in that country we celebrate with green: Ireland. But a few other countries, including France and Spain, share our green streak.

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Green bike lanes and rainbow crosswalks in Seattle, WA.

So on St. Patrick’s Day, let’s celebrate Ireland, the color green—and the growth of visible bike lanes across the United States and internationally.

Santa Monica Store Now Open On Main St

March 10th, 2016

Los Angelenos rejoice! PUBLIC Bikes Santa Monica is now open. This is our first ever Southern California store to serve the greater Los Angeles region. Located at 2714 Main Street, the heart and soul of Santa Monica, the store will serve locals and visitors Monday through Saturday, 11am – 7pm and Sundays, 11am – 6pm. PUBLIC is beyond… Read more »

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PUBLIC Santa Monica

Los Angelenos rejoice!

PUBLIC Bikes Santa Monica is now open. This is our first ever Southern California store to serve the greater Los Angeles region.

Located at 2714 Main Street, the heart and soul of Santa Monica, the store will serve locals and visitors Monday through Saturday, 11am – 7pm and Sundays, 11am – 6pm. PUBLIC is beyond thrilled to finally introduce its urban bikes and stylish gear to the LA scene. The Santa Monica PUBLIC store features our entire collection of PUBLIC bikes for sale and test riding, along with a large variety of PUBLIC accessories and gear.

Visit our PUBLIC Santa Monica store page for details on special in-store promotions going on in March and how you can enter to win a PUBLIC bike!

We’ve written before about why we’re excited to be joining the Santa Monica bike party and our reasons keep growing. Recently, Los Angeles announced it’s newly updated “Mobility Plan 2035” that sets new priorities for safety, access and reliability for all modes of transportation,

Plus, LA is on the verge of a city-wide bicycle movement. Santa Monica recently launched its first ever Bike Share program with great success, and according to the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition (LACBC), more Angelenos are riding their bikes year after year. LA is also building out hundreds of miles of new, protected bicycle lanes, creating a commuter cycling culture that’s helping to shape the future of its communities.

Just a few more reasons why we’re in the Santa Monica state-of-mind and think it’s the perfect time to set up shop in Santa Monica.

We are very excited to tell you what we’ve got in-store for you (did we mention we love a good pun?). PUBLIC Bikes is celebrating its Santa Monica store opening with its first (of many) monthly “Go PUBLIC” bike rides. This inaugural first ride on March 26 is going to be sweet (see, we warned you) because it involves doughnuts! Click on image below for the yummy details.

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Our goal is to make the PUBLIC Santa Monica store a community hub where people come to live, learn and ride. Sign up for our e-mail list below for more details and updates.

Sign up for Santa Monica updates:

Meet Shaun Boylan, Santa Monica Operations & Event Manager

February 12th, 2016

Our new PUBLIC Santa Monica retail store will be led by fun, creative, energetic bicycle advocates. One of these advocates is Shaun, who we think is also pretty funny – and if you’ve caught his improv shows, you’ll agree. Read below to learn more about Shaun. PUBLIC: Tell us a little about yourself. I am… Read more »

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Our new PUBLIC Santa Monica retail store will be led by fun, creative, energetic bicycle advocates. One of these advocates is Shaun, who we think is also pretty funny – and if you’ve caught his improv shows, you’ll agree. Read below to learn more about Shaun.

PUBLIC: Tell us a little about yourself.

I am a Florida native, born and bred in Palm Beach County, and attended Florida State University. After graduating, I moved to California and have resided in Los Angeles for 6 years now. Before joining PUBLIC, I worked as the Site Manager and Tour Director for the Santa Monica Bike Center, the largest cycling commuter facility in the nation, equipped with showers, lockers, a full & self-service repair shop, bicycle rentals and tours. It’s one of the greatest resources for cyclists in Los Angeles. I am a huge fan of food and have an awfully dangerous sweet tooth. Fun fact: I’ve never had a cavity.

PUBLIC: What do you like best about Los Angeles?
Los Angeles is a melting pot of cultures, creativity, cuisines, activities, lifestyles, and everything in between. The city is a great cultivator for big ideas, artistic expression, and collective endeavors. To top it off, it also has beautiful beaches and phenomenal weather year round, which is why you’ll find me spending the majority of my time on the Westside, near the ocean.

PUBLIC: Tell us some fact or background about yourself that might surprise people.
When I’m not at the PUBLIC store in Santa Monica, you can find me performing at a variety of comedy theaters in Los Angeles, as well as teaching improv at the Westside Comedy Theater in Santa Monica. I’ve been acting and performing for almost 10 years. It’s a huge passion of mine and I’m afraid I’ll be doing it way past my prime (which probably already happened). If you happen to see one of my shows and had a really bad experience, I’m sorry, and no, I cannot give you a refund.

PUBLIC: What’s your experience riding bikes in Los Angeles?
Before moving to LA, I decided to leave my car behind in Florida, with family instead of hauling it across the country. After arriving in SoCal without my gas-guzzler, I immediately made the decision to purchase a cheap beach cruiser and quickly realized that it was one of the most efficient ways to get around my new home; and while getting around LA without a car is not exactly easy, it’s also not impossible. I found that when biking to work I wasn’t sitting in traffic and worrying about finding a parking spot, which in LA, can turn what should be just a 10-minute drive into a 45-minute ordeal. When it came to short-distance trips, cycling proved to be, for the most part, faster and easier. I was hooked. I’m proud to say that I’ve been car-less ever since, and I’m going on 6 years now!

PUBLIC: What are your favorite routes or places to visit by bicycle in Los Angeles?
Believe it or not, my favorite ride also happens to be one of the most “touristy” rides. Nevertheless, the Santa Monica Beach Bike Path is a beautiful ride that truly defines the character and personality of LA. With its twenty-two miles of dedicated bike path, almost exclusively along the beach, and its gorgeous views of the coast-line, including access to vacation destination beach cities such as Santa Monica, Venice, Manhattan, Hermosa and Redondo Beach, this one-of-a-kind beach path is a “must-do” when visiting LA.

PUBLIC: What are you looking forward to in leading the new PUBLIC Santa Monica store?
Biking changed my life. It helped me to appreciate my surroundings, to care about the earth, to be more aware of my environmental footprint, and to take care of my health. It also empowered me with the freedom and confidence to carve my own path in life, in whichever way works best for me. In leading the new PUBLIC Santa Monica store, I am most looking forward to helping others discover the power of biking.

Catching Up With Sean, Our PUBLIC Seattle Store Manager

February 5th, 2016

Our PUBLIC Seattle Store Manager Sean Conroe is a cool guy. So cool that even Seattle Magazine profiled him a few years ago in a “Love Thy Neighbor” feature for his innovative urban agriculture work. We’re now lucky to have him leading our Seattle team. If you’re a local Seattle organization or company seeking to… Read more »

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Our PUBLIC Seattle Store Manager Sean Conroe is a cool guy. So cool that even Seattle Magazine profiled him a few years ago in a “Love Thy Neighbor” feature for his innovative urban agriculture work.

We’re now lucky to have him leading our Seattle team. If you’re a local Seattle organization or company seeking to collaborate with us, stop by our Seattle store and introduce yourself to Sean.

PUBLIC: Tell us a little about yourself.
I was born and raised in Western NY and spent 5 years in Las Vegas before moving up to Seattle. I’ve been here in the Emerald City for 12 years — time flies! Prior to PUBLIC, I worked to launch Pronto, Seattle’s bike share system with 500 bikes around the city. When not riding bikes, I’m often seeking out new adventures in the Pacific Northwest.

PUBLIC: What do you like best about Seattle?
Summer time? But honestly, what isn’t there to like about this town? From coffee to creativity to culture, Seattle has got it all.

PUBLIC: Tell us some fact or background about yourself that might surprise people.
I started an urban farming non-profit in 2009 that worked to connect people, place + produce using underutilized urban spaces right here in the city. Within a year, we had 2 farms up and running, and grew over 1,000 lbs. of food which right right back into the neighborhoods it was grown.

PUBLIC: What’s your experience riding bikes in Seattle?
I started Streets + Beats, a fundraising bike ride for the urban farming organization, and lead that for ~4 years which was a fully supported bike ride ranging from 50-75 miles. Aside from organizing that ride, I also worked with the American Diabetes Association to execute the Tour De Cure. On my own time, the 11 of the 12 years I lived here were car-free, which meant I walked, biked and used our public transit system the entire time. I got to know the city pretty well for which streets to avoid the hills!

PUBLIC: What are your favorite routes or places to visit by bicycle in Seattle?
The Elliott Bay trail through the Olympic Sculpture Park into Magnolia is one of the most enjoyable — especially during summer where you can hop off at one point and forage all the wild blackberries you want before riding down to Golden Gardens and enjoying a bon fire with friends.

PUBLIC: What are you looking forward to in leading the new PUBLIC Seattle store?
Bikes to me offer a sense of empowerment and freedom, and I’m thrilled be a part of the decision making process for folks looking to ride, wether recreationally or for commuting.

Vertical Parking Through The Years

February 3rd, 2016

With the advent of cars decades ago as the dominant means of transportation, city planners and developers reshaped our public and private spaces to accommodate the storage of these personal vehicles. By making it easy to find free or subsidized low cost parking, many cities simply encouraged more people to own and drive cars which… Read more »

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With the advent of cars decades ago as the dominant means of transportation, city planners and developers reshaped our public and private spaces to accommodate the storage of these personal vehicles.

By making it easy to find free or subsidized low cost parking, many cities simply encouraged more people to own and drive cars which simply resulted in more congestion and environmental problems.

Since cars take up so much space, people have always tried to find ways to store them vertically to reduce their ground-level footprint. This series of photos, “Vertical Parking“, shows how cities have attempted to accommodate the car through the decades.

The photo below is in New York City in ~1920.

An elevator parking lot, where the cars are hoisted up on individual platforms to save space, early 1920s. (Photo by FPG/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


This one below is in Chicago in ~1941.

A vertical parking lot structure in Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, c. 1941. (Photo by Underwood Archives/Getty Images)


If we spent as much effort and resources trying to house people, instead of cars, think about how different cities would be?

In contrast, a few cities like Amsterdam face an entirely different dilemma – how to accommodate the shortage of bike parking spots?

BikeParking-CentraalStation_0Photo credit: Poom!/flickr

In the article, “Amsterdam mulls underwater bike garage as available parking for cyclists dwindles,” Amsterdam is even exploring ways to go vertical but in a different direction than up.

Most cities have more available parking than people think. For example, it’s estimated in San Francisco alone, where people complain about lack of car parking all the time, that San Francisco has enough street parking space to fill the entire California coastline.

The problem is multi-faceted, but there many steps cities can do to improve parking and create better spaces for people. However, we think the biggest bang for taxpayer buck is for cities to be less obsessed about accommodating the car, but more focused on making other transportation options more accessible and safer to a wider number of people.

Not everyone is going to bike, walk, or take transit. But by making those transportation choices safer and easier for more people, it means less people driving and looking for parking. And hopefully, as more cities are successful in shifting people’s choices on how they get around, it will create a new set of good problems – like how to accommodate more bikes, more pedestrians, and more public transit riders.

The urbanist writer Lewis Mumford once wrote, “The right to have access to every building in the city by private motorcar in an age when everyone possesses such a vehicle is the right to destroy the city.” Instead of focusing on creating more space for cars, which has destroyed the character of many neighborhoods and cities, let’s focus on building beautiful, enlightened cities for people.

Why Does LA Get Such a Bad Rap?

January 28th, 2016

Los Angeles is perpetually slammed by urbanists for being a sprawling, car-centric culture — earmarked by freeways, congestion and poor public transportation. This is an oversimplification. LA was built around the car, but there are amazing new transportation developments taking place. I grew up in Los Angeles right next to the Pasadena Freeway, and I am… Read more »

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LA Bike-Friendly
Los Angeles is perpetually slammed by urbanists for being a sprawling, car-centric culture — earmarked by freeways, congestion and poor public transportation. This is an oversimplification. LA was built around the car, but there are amazing new transportation developments taking place.

I grew up in Los Angeles right next to the Pasadena Freeway, and I am well aware of the changes that have evolved in recent decades. In many communities there has been a sea change of sorts—a move away from the car and a focus on a lifestyle that supports sustainable transportation.

bike-friendly LA

If you live in parts of the West Side of Los Angeles or have visited recently you can’t help but notice the huge proliferation of all types of bike riders — from weekend road warriors to daily commuters to surfers on cruiser bikes. There are miles of bike lanes along the beach, and a slew of bike rental shops and city bikes for rent.

What I don’t understand is why no one acknowledges that in these parts of the West Side Los Angeles region there appear to be more bike lanes and bike riders than almost anywhere else in California (other than perhaps sections of San Francisco and some college towns). In my opinion, the Santa Monica and Venice areas may be among the best life/work set-ups in California for someone not wishing to commute by car.

Santa Monica just launched a new bike sharing program. And soon there will be a LA Metro line providing train service to Santa Monica. When this Santa Monica station opens, you’ll be able to take your bike on a fast train from downtown LA to within a few blocks from the ocean. Just think – you’ll never be “stuck” in highway traffic if you choose a more accessible, fast public transit option.

CicLavia is the largest open streets event in North America and it’s changing how residents think about transportation and healthy living. You can keep up with the latest in transportation-related news by reading Streetsblog LA.

Just take a look at a few lists of the top “US Cities To Ride” here and here and you’ll find no mention of Los Angeles anywhere. Perhaps this is because we focus on LA’s insatiable appetite for freeways, and simply do not see what’s really going on there in terms of alternative transportation.

In any case, this fuels us even more to prove that the Los Angeles region is thinking differently about transportation with the opening of our PUBLIC Santa Monica shop at 2714 Main Street in mid-March. We’re super excited to be opening up on Main Street to help grow this already booming bike community.

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Rob Forbes
PUBLIC Founder