Live Well Do Good Giveaway Winners

June 3rd, 2016

We partnered with GOOD and Nutcase on a giveaway of two customized PUBLIC x GOOD bikes, along with Nutcase helmets and bells, to celebrate the launch of our new PUBLIC Santa Monica store. Our two winners are Kaitlin H. from Los Angeles and Scott H. from West Linn, OR. Kaitlin lives in the Los Feliz… Read more »

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We partnered with GOOD and Nutcase on a giveaway of two customized PUBLIC x GOOD bikes, along with Nutcase helmets and bells, to celebrate the launch of our new PUBLIC Santa Monica store.

Our two winners are Kaitlin H. from Los Angeles and Scott H. from West Linn, OR.

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Kaitlin lives in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles and works as a Civil Engineer for LA County. She love taking her dog to Griffith Park and enjoying the live music scene. She bikes occasionally. As she describes, “my bike is kind of falling apart, so this new PUBLIC bike is coming at a great time.” Her most memorable rides have been during CicLAvia and a brewery bike crawl with friends in Torrance. She looks forward to combining biking and using the Metro to get around LA.

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Scott owns a landscaping company. His family lives right next to a big park so for fun he joins his wife and daughter on rides with their PUBLIC bikes. They love vacationing in Bend and also seeing live music. Their family loves the outdoors so Scott looks forward to taking his new bike on trips.

Los Angeles, You Just Got A Lot Cooler (and Greener)

May 27th, 2016

On Friday, May 20, Los Angeles debuted a game-changing new public transit station. The new Metro Expo rail station in downtown Santa Monica is located just a few walking blocks from the beach. For the first time in 63 years, you can now take rail service from downtown Los Angeles to the beach. Once again,… Read more »

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On Friday, May 20, Los Angeles debuted a game-changing new public transit station. The new Metro Expo rail station in downtown Santa Monica is located just a few walking blocks from the beach.

For the first time in 63 years, you can now take rail service from downtown Los Angeles to the beach. Once again, LA is proving that it doesn’t deserve such a bad rap when it comes to transportation.

The local elected Supervisor Sheila Kuehl, featured in the above video, points out all the obvious reasons why this new rail extension will be a success.

And from first-hand account, it already is a huge success. PUBLIC’s Santa Monica retail store is located at 2714 Main St only a 15 minute bike ride from the Santa Monica Metro station.

To celebrate the new Metro Expo Line Grand Opening this past weekend, PUBLIC Bikes Santa Monica partnered with the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Sustainable Streets, Breeze Bike Share, and the Santa Monica Bike Center for a city-wide Santa Monica Bike + Train Tour.

What exactly is a “Bike + Train Tour” you might ask?

We took 50 participants, via Breeze Bike Share bikes, on a bike ride to Bergamot Station (led by Certified League Cycling Instructors!) to experience the brand new Expo Line. It was a great way to show people how easy it is to ride a bike – whether their personal one or a Breeze Bike Share bike – to connect with rail serve.

We started out checking in registered participants at our PUBLIC Santa Monica store throughout the day. Each participant got a free helmet and goodie bag.

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Once everyone was set up, we showed them how to unlock and use Breeze Bike Share bikes, which are located all over Santa Monica, including a station just a few blocks from PUBLIC Bikes Santa Monica. There are convenient Breeze Bike Share stations at each of the three new metro stops in Santa Monica so it’s easy to connect bikes with rail service.

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We then started riding through town to showcase some of the great bicycle infrastructure, including this two-way protected bike lane that runs through the middle of Pico Blvd.

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We rode along the green bike lane on Michigan Ave.

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We dropped off our Breeze Bike Share bikes at the new Bergamot/26th Street Metro station to head west to the new downtown Santa Monica Metro station.

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The new Metro line to the beach is so successful that during peak times, it will likely be packed with riders wanting to avoid having to drive. The good news is that with high ridership, Metro will need to add capacity and frequency to accommodate more people making the switch to rail service.

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One of the only downsides we noticed with the new Metro line is the train car capacity to handle bicycles. When the train is not full, it’s easy to bring your bike onto the train. But when it’s full, there aren’t any train cars dedicated to bike parking.

Until this happens, it will be a challenge to bring your own bicycle on the train to the beach on a busy, crowded weekend day. This is unfortunate given that one of the main advantages of rail service to Santa Monica is the opportunity to bring your own bicycle – possibly your own PUBLIC bike! – on the train and then riding your bike along the beach or elsewhere in the westside of Los Angeles County.

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The beautiful new downtown Santa Monica Metro station is located just a few blocks from the beach. And it’s just a 15 minute bus ride or Breeze Bike ride away from our PUBLIC Bikes Santa Monica store at 2714 Main Street.

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We even spotted a PUBLIC bike parked at the Santa Monica metro station.

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Outside the Santa Monica Metro station is an all-way pedestrian scramble intersection that allows large numbers of pedestrians to safely cross the main intersection next to the station.

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And there are new wide sidewalks and protected bike lanes that allow people to safely and comfortably connect from the beach or downtown to the Metro Station.

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Our successful Bike + Train tour reminded us of some very important lessons about public transit, bike share and urban planning. The key is to make things easy and accessible to a wide array of people. We saw lots of potential in terms of the “last mile” connection between this new Metro station, bike share, and bus lines to assist people to get to where they want to go.

It was exciting to see how many people will be taking advantage of this game-changing transit extension. When you ride a bike, it usually means “One Less Car” on the road.

With this Metro extension, everyday literally thousands of cars will be removed from Los Angeles streets because people have a convenient option to get to the beach, downtown Santa Monica, or some nearby destination.

Los Angeles, you just got a lot cooler – and greener.

Bike to Work in Style, Commute Like a European

May 19th, 2016

In the United States, we tend to be hard on ourselves about our rate of biking to work compared to Europe. However, we have reason to celebrate during this Bike to Work month. In America, the ranks of cycling commuters are only growing: our numbers rose about 60 percent throughout the aughts, from 488,000 bike… Read more »

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In the United States, we tend to be hard on ourselves about our rate of biking to work compared to Europe. However, we have reason to celebrate during this Bike to Work month. In America, the ranks of cycling commuters are only growing: our numbers rose about 60 percent throughout the aughts, from 488,000 bike commuters in the year 2000 to roughly 786,000 in 2008–2012, according to the US Census. More recently, biking to work has continued to trend upwards from 2006 to 2013 among workers of all income brackets.

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Although our patterns of bike commuting are looking rosy, we in the United States still have plenty to learn from Europe so that everyday people cycle as a matter of habit across the nation. Here’s how pedaling commuters get to work in style in the two cities with some of the highest rates of bicycling.

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Image via Wikimedia Commons

COPENHAGEN, Denmark

In Copenhagen, almost half of the population cycles to their school or office. We can glean some infrastructure lessons—as well as style tips—from Denmark’s bike to work culture.

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Image by Tony Webster via flickr

Infrastructure ingenuity

  • Only one percent of Copenhageners mention the environment as the reason they ride. Most of them do it because it’s the easiest way to scoot around town. Strong cycling infrastructure makes the choice obvious.
  • Traffic lights are coordinated for bicycles, not cars.
  • When it snows, bike lanes have priority for cleaning before roads. No wonder the majority of commuters still cycle through Copenhagen’s white winters.
  • City planners made bike lanes the most direct routes to the city center, according to the Guardian.
  • Footrests and railings allow riders to stop at a light without hopping off their seats. (Seattle recently added these—go Seattle!)
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Image by Bimbimbikes via Flickr

Cycling style

  • Copenhageners prefer bike baskets, storing their work supplies in a way that keeps the burden off their backs.
  • Personalizing the baskets with flowers and stickers gives cyclists a personal connection with their ride.
  • The baskets can be easily taken off the front handlebars, allowing for shopping and moving around.
  • Comfy saddles are standard. Brooks leather saddles can be seen around Copenhagen.
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By Jorge Royan via Wikimedia Commons

AMSTERDAM, the Netherlands

About 63 percent of Amsterdammers bike every day. Cycling to work is in their DNA. Here’s how it happened.

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Image by Apoikola via Wikimedia Commons

Infrastructure ingenuity

  • Dutch bike lanes are wide enough to allow for side-by-side biking, according to the BBC, allowing you to chat with your “bikepool” buddy.
  • Many cycling routes are offset from cars and the rest of the road, making commuters feel safe.
  • Bicyclists are treated as the first-class citizens they deserve to be. You’ll find signs that read: “Bike Street: Cars are guests.”
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Image by TCP via flickr.

Cycling style

  • Dutch children start biking as babies in cargo bikes, called bakfiets in Dutch.
  • Bikers don’t consider cycling a lifestyle choice. Rather, it’s a default mode. As such, their bikes aren’t consumer accessories to show off a subculture, but workaday vehicles, according to the BBC. In such a culture, cycling might seem more accessible to the rich and poor alike.
  • Sliding wheel locks allow for cyclists to quickly secure their bike and hop into the coffee shop on their ride to work.
  • Popular dynamo headlights are powered by pedaling—so you don’t have to remember to recharge them or replace the batteries.
  • Commuters bike to work in skirts and heels like it ain’t no thang, thanks to the predominance of Dutch-style step-through bikes. Seeing others do it all the time makes it seem natural… so why not start the trend in your city?

Increasing the number of bike commuters in the United States will have to be a joint effort between policymakers and the people on the streets. Start today to create the cycling culture you’d like to live in: Write a letter to your local representative to prioritize bike infrastructure. Then, slip on your high heeled shoes, put your laptop in your bike basket, and cycle to work with a smile. You might inspire someone else to do the same.

Black Girls Do Bike Inspires Women To Cycle

May 16th, 2016

PUBLIC is proud to support Black Girls Do Bike and their efforts to promote healthier lifestyles. We interview founder Monica Garrison below. Also learn more about the upcoming June 10-12 Black Girls Do Bike’s first National Event in Atlanta. PUBLIC Interview With Monica Garrison, founder of Black Girls Do Bike What was the inspiration behind… Read more »

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Black Girls Do Bike

PUBLIC is proud to support Black Girls Do Bike and their efforts to promote healthier lifestyles. We interview founder Monica Garrison below. Also learn more about the upcoming June 10-12 Black Girls Do Bike’s first National Event in Atlanta.

PUBLIC Interview With Monica Garrison, founder of Black Girls Do Bike

Black Girls Do Bike Monica Garrison

What was the inspiration behind launching Black Girls Do Bike? Tell us about coming up with the name.

The inspiration came after re-discovering how much I enjoyed the simple act of riding my bike in the spring and summer of 2013. I was reaping the physical and mental benefits and my children were joining me and learning to survive without their electronic devices. In my travels I quickly realized that there were very few women who looked like me out riding.

BlackGirlsDoBike.com was an attempt to seek out like minded women who had a passion for cycling but also to inspire those bike-curious lady who were just an obstacle away from cycling regularly. I chose to state it in the affirmative, “Black girls do bike!” as if to say that each time a women of color takes a ride she is reaffirming this truth to herself and to others.

Tell us more how Black Girls Do Bike is currently structured across the country and how volunteer leaders communicate and support each other?

Each of our chapters is led by a lady volunteer who we affectionately call a Shero. Each Shero at some point reached out to me with a desire to encourage more women in their community to ride bicycles. They lead rides, moderate their city’s individual Facebook group pages, network with local bike shops and bike/ped organizations and seek to be an overall voice of positivity and encouragement.

Internally all of our Sheroes are part of a secret Facebook group that we use to support one another in this endeavor. We offer praise, advice, frustrations and suggestions for success. We also have a Shero only password protected website with all the need to know stuff.

Black Girls Do Bike

What has surprised you about the being recognized and involved as a voice in the national bicycle advocacy movement?

The funny thing is that 4 years ago I didn’t even own a bike and had never participated in an organized bike ride of any sort. What I had was a desire to ride and that has set me on a truly life changing journey. It has been such a whirlwind for the past couple of years to be at the helm of such an amazing organization.

Now I find myself mentioned as a voice in the national bike advocacy movement. I am much more comfortable being considered a voice in the national women’s advocacy movement. Either way we are busy in the work of empowering women with the help of bicycles.

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Tell us about your upcoming June 10-12 National Meetup “We Ride Together” in Atlanta? What do you hope to accomplish?

Our main goal is to make a mark on the Atlanta Tour De Cure by having a large presence and raising a lot of money for a great cause. Diabetes affects African American families and specifically AA women at disproportionately high rates so for many of us this is personal.

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We chose Atlanta as the spot for our first national meetup as our chapter there is our largest with more than 1200 supporters. The weekend will consist of three days of bike related events. REI CoOp has pitched in to help with the needs of our ladies who are traveling in from out of town and will need their bikes assembled.

Civil Bikes has offered our members discounted rates on bike related historic tours around the city. The weekend will end with a celebration in the form of a relaxed recovery ride along the Atlanta Beltline. We will end up at Piedmont Park with a luncheon and festivities to be held at the beautiful Magnolia Hall. We have more than 15 sponsors so our giveaways at this event will be epic.

Black Girls Do Bike

Some of the main reasons people cite that they don’t bike is that they perceive it as an unsafe or inaccessible activity — dangerous public streets, not enough protected bicycle infrastructure, access to trails and bike paths is far and too infrequent. Are there other obstacles – perceived or real – that you think are specific to encourage more women of color to get on a bike?

I believe there are many points of overlap in terms of why people shy away from riding bikes. Many women of color are overweight or obese and those with negative body image issues are less likely to try a new form of exercise with people they don’t know or trust. Our offer to include riders of all levels in our groups rides, which are “no women left behind”, can help those who might not want to tackle new and unfamiliar activity on their own. A friendly Shero who is willing to accompany a new rider to the local bike shop and help her navigate decisions of what type of bike and accessories to purchase can be invaluable. Surprising many women did not learn to ride in childhood so they are even more apprehensive to start as an adult.

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What’s next for Black Girls Do Bike after the National Meetup? What other initiatives, events, and partnerships are you looking forward to?

We are also working on a process to have all of our leadership formerly become certified ride leaders by developing our own course or taking advantage of an education program already in place. We have been contacted by some big names in the cycling community who want to help us further the reach and mission of BGDB. So we plan to pursue those leads and form some strategic partnerships.

Black Girls Do Bike

I like the idea of having BGDB ladies from all over the country converge on different cycling events to increase our visibility. Events like NYC’s 5 Boro Bike Tour, Alabama’s Bo Bikes Bama, Maryland’s Seagull Century the Tour de Cure series and many more. If our national meet up this June does what it seeks to accomplish, we may make this a biennial event.

Fit, Safety And Why You Should Replace Your Bike Helmet Every 5 Years

May 10th, 2016

Maybe you’re on the hunt for just the right bike helmet, or perhaps you’re already rocking the one you love. Whatever the case may be, these four factors from the Snell Foundation should be taken into consideration whether you’re buying your first helmet and/or ensuring that the one you have fits properly. 1. FIT. Find… Read more »

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Maybe you’re on the hunt for just the right bike helmet, or perhaps you’re already rocking the one you love. Whatever the case may be, these four factors from the Snell Foundation should be taken into consideration whether you’re buying your first helmet and/or ensuring that the one you have fits properly.

1. FIT. Find a bike helmet that suits both the size and shape of your head. “A helmet should fit comfortably, sit level over the forehead and not have any ‘pressure points’ that would indicate it’s too snug or small,” writes Aaron Glick, a product and purchasing manager at PUBLIC Bikes. “The chin strap should be snug, but allow for a few fingers to fit in between the step and the chin, and allow one to breathe and open their mouth freely.”

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2. COMFORT. Imagine wearing your bike helmet for hours, and ask yourself if you’d still be comfortable. Does it have enough ventilation? High-quality ventilation will increase the price of your helmet, but if it’ll encourage you to wear your helmet and bike more, it could be worth it. Do you feel any pinching? Better yet: Test drive your helmet for as long as possible, and see how it feels over time.

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3. STYLE. If you look like a motorcycle cop in your helmet, you might not be as psyched about riding your bike. Pick a bike helmet that makes you smile so that you’ll want to wear it. Search for colors and patterns that suit your vibes or coordinate with your wardrobe.

4. SAFETY. The materials in your helmet deteriorate. Your sweat and hair oils erode at the glues and resins in your gear. To make sure your helmet is protecting you to its fullest, you should replace it every five years, according to the helmet safety nonprofit Snell Foundation. Check the age of your own helmet by looking for the manufacturing date, usually found on a sticker on the inside of your helmet.

Your pick of helmet is a personal choice. Just keep it fresh, and you’ll be good to pedal for five more years!

DAPPER DAY + PUBLIC Giveaway Winner

May 9th, 2016

In honor of our first-ever PUBLIC SoCal store that opened earlier this year at 2714 Main Street in Santa Monica, we partnered with DAPPER DAY to give away a very special custom DAPPER DAY + PUBLIC Bike. And we’re happier than the happiest place on earth to announce that the winner of the DAPPER DAY x… Read more »

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In honor of our first-ever PUBLIC SoCal store that opened earlier this year at 2714 Main Street in Santa Monica, we partnered with DAPPER DAY to give away a very special custom DAPPER DAY + PUBLIC Bike.

And we’re happier than the happiest place on earth to announce that the winner of the DAPPER DAY x PUBLIC Bikes Giveaway Contest is Alejandra from Los Angeles.

Alejandra says she “couldn’t be more excited” about her new bike. She used to spend her Sunday afternoons in college “biking down to Dockweiler Beach, exploring Manhattan Beach, making my way over to Hermosa Beach and Redondo Beach, and enjoying the sunshine on my way back home.” And now with this new PUBLIC bike, she’ll be able to fill her Sunday afternoons with beach bound rides again.

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Some of Alejandra’s hobbies include sewing and crafting, and she loves dressing in vintage-inspired wear. We think her new Dapper Day + PUBLIC bike will compliment her vintage-style quite perfectly.

DAPPER DAY is a very big deal in her life. She says about the Dapper Day Expo held at Disneyland, “it brings so much creativity to a place rich in history and culture. Everyone is dressed ever-so sharp and sophisticated that it just leaves you in awe.”

Big thanks to all who entered and sign up for our e-newsletter to hear about our next giveaway!

How to Bike with Kids on Mother’s Day—and Beyond

April 30th, 2016

On Mother’s Day, there are countless reasons our moms deserve handwritten cards and brunch. For some of us, those reasons include our fond memories of learning to ride a bike. Our mothers patiently guided us as we graduated from child bike seat to balance bike to kid bike with pedals. Just by watching Mom pedal around town… Read more »

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how to bike with kids child bicycle

On Mother’s Day, there are countless reasons our moms deserve handwritten cards and brunch. For some of us, those reasons include our fond memories of learning to ride a bike. Our mothers patiently guided us as we graduated from child bike seat to balance bike to kid bike with pedals. Just by watching Mom pedal around town herself, some of us learned to value biking for its exercise, convenience and fun factor.

For all those new mothers hoping to shape their children into cyclists, we salute you. Our figurative flowers for you include tips for teaching your kids the rituals of biking. Aside from the obvious habits that apply to all ages—wear a helmet, use hand signals, bike on the right side of the road—these pointers are kid specific.

With this advice, you’ll help your child safely grow from a bike-seat sidekick to a velodrome champion—well, if that’s what they want to be when they grow up. You can also read riding tips we collected from some of our favorite bike-riding Moms.

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The bike seat years: One-year-old to toddler

  • Before you start adventuring around town with your baby in a bike seat, your child should be one year old. They should be able to hold up their own head with a helmet on and not slump over in the bike seat, according to bikeportland.org.
    Choose a comfortable child seat with a sturdy harness. Once the child is old enough to unbuckle things, make sure they know not to escape from their harness mid-ride!
  • Start small and bike on quiet streets for short rides so that both you and your baby get comfortable.
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  • In addition to putting a helmet on your baby, always wear your own helmet to role model safe biking behavior!
  • This tip comes from the blog of PUBLIC C7 rider Joanna Goddard (past interview here): “If you have one young child, I would definitely recommend a front seat. You feel close and connected, since you can easily chat and point at things and see what they’re looking at. Plus, I find that having that extra weight in the front versus the back of the bike is easier for balancing.”
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The balance bike to training wheels years: Three- to seven-years-old or older

  • Consider a balance bike or push bike. A balance bike has no pedals and helps children focus on first learning to balance on two wheels. Once they have mastered the art of balancing they might be able to skip a pedal kids bike with training wheels all together.
  • After a balance bike, if possible, try to encourage your child to try a pedal kids bike without training wheels. By learning to ride without training wheels, your child will learn balance speed. Keep the seat low so your child can put both feet on the ground. Sometimes it’s easier to start on a gentle slope to get the pedal kids bike moving for balancing and then your child can start pedaling.
  • If your child does not have a lot of riding confidence, a pedal kids bike with training wheels is an option. Training wheels don’t help a child learn the importance of balance speed but they can help a less confident rider get going. All of PUBLIC’s smaller 16″ wheel size pedal kids bikes come with optional training wheels. It might sound contrary, but positioning the training wheels a little higher off the ground than you think will actually create more stability for the child when rolling, says PUBLIC product manager, Aaron Glick.
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  • Even though your child is low to the ground, buy your little biker a normal bicycle helmet, labeled with a certification by the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
  • Only let your child explore quiet, safe places—away from dangers such as cars and swimming pools.
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The bicycle years: Seven-years-old and beyond

  • Allow your children to graduate from a training wheels only once they’ve gained the necessary sense of balance, usually around five to seven years old.
  • Kids at 10-years-old and younger are safer riding on the sidewalk than on the street, according to Safe Kids.
  • Teach your young cyclist to make eye contact with drivers before crossing an intersection. They should make sure that the driver sees them and is going to stop.
  • Try a bike-to-school route! One adult could potentially lead the way, picking up children along the path to school to join the caravan.
  • Ditch the tandem bike. Children should be able to match your pedalling power before they tandem bike, which might take until they reach age 12, according to Outside Online.
  • For long journeys, consider a trailercycle, advises cyclist Charles Scott. You can store your supplies as well as resting children in your trailer. Once they’re ready, kids can get back on the bike and feel like part of the team.

Once your kids start pedaling, they might know their way around their neighborhood better than those kids who are only driven around in cars, at least one study has shown. The study also indicated that cycling kids have a richer connection with their community; they remember more spaces where they like to play than exclusively car-driven kids.

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In that case, what better way to celebrate Mother’s Day than pedaling around your neighborhood together? You’ll give yourself the gift of fun and exercise—and your children the gift of a more memorable childhood.

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Photography credit goes to the talents of Jetkat Photography. Model credit goes to the beautiful family of Copy Cat Chic. And big thanks to Rebecca Huval for making this post possible.

The Cars Are Jealous Of This Colorful Bike Corral Mural

April 13th, 2016

We’re all about making the world a more sustainable and healthier place through thoughtful urban design and sustainable transportation. So we got a special kick out of a recent public project in San Francisco that transformed a single car parking spot on the corner of Fell and Divisadero into a bike parking corral for 12 bikes… Read more »

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We’re all about making the world a more sustainable and healthier place through thoughtful urban design and sustainable transportation. So we got a special kick out of a recent public project in San Francisco that transformed a single car parking spot on the corner of Fell and Divisadero into a bike parking corral for 12 bikes with a vibrant, colorful street mural underfoot.

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Eric Tuvel in the bike corral.

We caught up with the mastermind behind this bike corral mural, Eric Tuvel (pictured above). Read on for more about Eric, how this project came about, and how you can implement a bike corral mural in your city.

PUBLIC: You’re both a visual designer and a bicycle advocate? Tell us more about your background.
Eric: My background in Graphic Design started in undergrad, which is where I started commuting by bike to class and to get around campus. As I pursued my master’s degree in City & Regional Planning, I began applying my design background to cities and commuting by bike became more about shaping how people move around the city. Before joining the SFMTA (San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency) as a Transportation Planner in the Sustainable Streets division, I was the Design and Program Manager at the SF Bicycle Coalition. It was there I got more involved in advocacy and the biking community of San Francisco and fused my design/planning background with my love for biking.

PUBLIC: What was the inspiration behind this bike corral mural concept?
Eric: In my first position at the SFMTA I managed the bicycle parking program. As I started siting and surveying for sidewalk racks and on-street corrals, I started to see the various ways people tried to bring art into these bike parking facilities. Talking with my coworker one day, the idea just hit us and we thought, “What about painting a mural underneath the corral on the street?” It was really serendipitous.
Once the idea was planted in my head, I was determined.
I started running it by staff at various city agencies to get the approvals I needed. As for the mural that was installed, it was done by Bay Area artist Kristin Farr. She selected colors from the streetscape at the location to come up with the palette for the piece. She was selected by the sponsor, Madrone Art Bar, and was great to work with on the project. The piece is titled “Diamonds on Divis”.

PUBLIC: What were the major challenges to getting this bike corral mural implemented?
Eric: The major challenge was creating a process for something that hasn’t been done before. The main thing I did was talk to as many people as I could and loop in all the city departments and stakeholders I could think of. It’s a really positive project so overall everyone was supportive but there were some small concerns we were able to work through and got everyone on board. The other unforeseen challenge was the weather! Scheduling a time to paint was a little tricky with the recent fits and starts of rain we’ve had.

bike corral mural

Image courtesy of SFMTA.

PUBLIC: How is this project funded?
Eric: “Diamonds on Divis” was funded privately by the Madrone Art Bar. They applied for a corral in 2015 and we approved the location. When I came up with the idea, I thought Madrone was the perfect partner for the first one as the corral wasn’t installed yet and Madone is an art bar. I brought the idea to Michael Krouse, the owner, and he was on board right away. I feel lucky that we had a partner that was so easy to work with and was supportive from the beginning.

PUBLIC: If you’re an art and bicycle enthusiast outside of San Francisco, what should this person do to replicate a bike corral mural in another city?
Eric: First, learn more about what the city process is for something like this. Start with the department that installs bike parking in the city. The process might not be clear, but be persistent and keep talking to folks. Don’t be discouraged by how long it might take because the results are worth the work.

bike corral mural

PUBLIC: What’s next to expand this concept to other parts of San Francisco?
Eric: The next steps would be to evaluate the current bike corral mural, or “bikelet” as I’ve been calling it, over the next few months, primarily to see how it holds up to the elements. We are definitely interested in expanding the program and partnering with other organizations. We encourage interested organizations to contact us and we will be looking into proactively outreaching to businesses that are applying for or already have bicycle corrals. If people are interested they can contact Bikeparking@sfmta.com.

April Rider Profile: Darcy From Fayetteville

April 7th, 2016

Through insightful Facebook comments, glittering Instagram snapshots and daily social media chatter, our PUBLIC community never ceases to inspire. So we thought we’d start a monthly series highlighting an image shared on social media by a PUBLIC rider that caught our eye, and learning a little more about the rider behind the shot. This month it’s Darcy… Read more »

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public rider profile
Through insightful Facebook comments, glittering Instagram snapshots and daily social media chatter, our PUBLIC community never ceases to inspire. So we thought we’d start a monthly series highlighting an image shared on social media by a PUBLIC rider that caught our eye, and learning a little more about the rider behind the shot.

This month it’s Darcy from Fayetteville, AR. She took the photo above of her Slate Blue PUBLIC V7 and we can’t think of a better way to sum up Spring.

Darcy writes about her hometown of Fayetteville…

“Fayetteville is home to a city bike trail called the Razorback Regional Greenway. It’s a 36 mile, mostly off road, paved trail that stretches from South Fayetteville up to Bella Vista. It connects riders to many city attractions and hot spots all over NWA. I love to take my PUBLIC V7 out on the trails on Sunday afternoon—riding and stopping along the way for a coffee or even some shopping. It’s definitely a favorite way to spend an afternoon.”

And she describes the inspiration behind the photo…

“On the day I took this photo it was finally starting to get warm and I was excited to take my camera out for some photos of some fresh blooms I had been seeing around town. I am a blogger (Helloluvvy.com) and taking my bike out to explore and take photos is something I do regularly. This tree, not far from my home, was absolutely amazing. I took lots of pictures of it for the blog and since I think my PUBLIC V7 is also amazing I added it in the photo.”

Thanks for sharing your story, Darcy. We look forward to highlighting next month’s inspiring rider!

Celebrating The Green Bike Lane

March 15th, 2016

Written By Rebecca Huval On the upcoming holiday celebrating all things Irish and green, we should also pause to celebrate the green bike lane. These ribbons of color do more than brighten up an otherwise dull road—they give cyclists a sense of safety, create clarity for drivers, and announce to everyone on the road that… Read more »

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Written By Rebecca Huval

celebrating green bike lanes

Green on green in Vancouver, Canada.

On the upcoming holiday celebrating all things Irish and green, we should also pause to celebrate the green bike lane. These ribbons of color do more than brighten up an otherwise dull road—they give cyclists a sense of safety, create clarity for drivers, and announce to everyone on the road that bikes belong there. We’ve written about various colors in public spaces, including green bike lanes, in our past blog post “Rolling out the Green Carpet in San Francisco.”

Celebrating the green bike lane

Green bike lanes in Portland, Oregon. Image By Steve Morgan

In the past decade or so, these highly visible routes have rolled out in the United States, from Salt Lake City to Los Angeles. Portland was a leader in the early days, implementing green lanes at a time when there were no clear federal guidelines on bike lane colors. Then, in 2011, the US Department of Transportation officially approved green to mark bike lanes. It was chosen because of its visibility.

Celebrating the green bike lane

Green bike lanes in Santa Monica, California.

That, and because all the others were taken—blue for handicapped spots, even purple for specific toll plaza approach lanes. Now, as one California city’s website explains, “Bright green painted bike lanes are sweeping the nation, and Santa Monica is no exception.”

Celebrating Green Bike lanes

Blue bike lanes in Denmark. Image via Wikimedia.

We in the United States aren’t the first to paint our bike lanes, but we have claimed green as our own. Starting in the early 1980s, Copenhagen painted blue strips to mark the safe zone for cyclists to cross an intersection. On the other side of the spectrum, bike lanes are often red in Amsterdam and even in that country we celebrate with green: Ireland. But a few other countries, including France and Spain, share our green streak.

celebrating green bike lanes

Green bike lanes and rainbow crosswalks in Seattle, WA.

So on St. Patrick’s Day, let’s celebrate Ireland, the color green—and the growth of visible bike lanes across the United States and internationally.