Cartagena – See It on Foot

October 19th, 2011

Driving through a city is great if your goal is to get to the other side. If, on the other hand, you want to learn about, notice, savor, discover what’s actually there, a slower pace is recommended. Detail and interest emerge when we give our senses a little time to take things in. That’s why… Read more »

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Driving through a city is great if your goal is to get to the other side. If, on the other hand, you want to learn about, notice, savor, discover what’s actually there, a slower pace is recommended. Detail and interest emerge when we give our senses a little time to take things in. That’s why we sip whiskey, lick ice cream, and kiss slowly. That’s why we read the book, not just the outline. And that’s why a walk or a bike ride through a city is so much more compelling and pleasurable than a car ride.

Take Cartagena, Colombia for example. To be appreciated, this steamy, walled port city demands attention. The occasional distracted glance through a car window just won’t get it done. That’s probably part of the reason its been designated a UNESCO site – to preserve the pedestrian friendly historic streets and allow visitors and locals to drink in the color and detail, like these windows we found in two days of wandering around on bike and on foot last week.

Cartagena is no longer about drugs and muggings. It’s about a diverse Caribbean culture and history. You can bike there, but Bogota is the most bike friendly Colombian city with its Ciclovia program – now respected and widely imitated around the world.

Portland Street Sense

October 6th, 2011

Last week I wrote about the inspiring handmade bike design contest held in Portland: the Oregon Manifest Design Challenge. Portland leads the nation in the percentage of people who commute or ride a bike everyday. What is less known is the fact that Portland might be the most progressive public transit city in the US…. Read more »

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Last week I wrote about the inspiring handmade bike design contest held in Portland: the Oregon Manifest Design Challenge. Portland leads the nation in the percentage of people who commute or ride a bike everyday. What is less known is the fact that Portland might be the most progressive public transit city in the US. You almost feel that you are in Europe. It forces some unfavorable comparisons with our transit system in San Francisco.

TriMet, Portland, OR



TriMet, Portland, OR


BART, San Francisco, CA



Pacific Electric Railway, CA



Food Trucks, Portland, OR



Parklet, San Francisco, CA

When you arrive at the airport in Portland you are greeted by the Light Rail, which is part of the TriMet system. It delivers you into the city for about $3.00 – an average price for many European trains. The price is kept low to encourage people not to drive to the airport. BART, San Francisco’s public transportation to the airport, costs about $8.00.

Aside from the cost, productive comparisons can be drawn from the design. Portland’s rail cars are colorful and modern on the interior and exterior, with places to store bikes, ramps to make it easy to enter, and a generally cheerful ambience. The seating is an easy to clean, modern vinyl. Our BART cars have an aging institutional feel, with scary signage. The upholstery is unhygienic to such a degree that it got written up in the New York Times. Apparently help is on the way and San Francisco will be spending $2 Million for a remake.

When you get to Portland’s city center you find more modern streetcars and it feels very much like the trams in Zurich or Amsterdam. It’s easy to get almost anywhere in the city as the transit systems are connected. For most of us in SF, when we arrive downtown from BART, getting home or to work is often complicated, time consuming, or expensive.

Portland is billed as the “first modern streetcar system in the US,” but this may be an exaggeration. There were many modern electric streetcar systems throughout the US in the early 20th century. These rail lines were torn and replaced by buses and cars – often billed as a conspiracy led by GM. We believe more rails, more bikes, and less cars will beautify our cities and attract healthier lifestyles. That’s why we support efforts to reduce private auto trips along Market Street, one of San Francisco’s major thoroughfares.

Although there are still plenty of cars in downtown Portland, the city has done some clever things to keep them at bay. For example, there is an unsightly central parking lot that has now been surrounded by a perimeter of colorful and friendly food trucks that offer a great selection of affordable ethnic foods. These food trucks lend a vibrant touch to the city and turn an asphalt parking lot into a community asset and destination.

Converting asphalt into food courts is one area where San Francisco holds its own. Our numerous parklets, food trucks, farmers markets, and street vendors are world class and growing in number. An SF based organization, Off the Grid, brings together the eclectic community of local food trucks. SF Pavement to Parks makes it accessible for small businesses to transform the parking spaces outside of their business into mini parks. The best part is that our local government generally supports these efforts. We’d like to see more government-subsidized projects that directly benefit environment and community.

Social Networking in Southern Italy

June 15th, 2011

We were in Puglia (the heel of the boot of Italy) last month, doing what you do there: eating, roaming around, and checking out the local culture. As with all of Italy you come across contrasts to what you see at home: stone streets, tile floors, ancient towns, small cars, baroque churches, arches, and unique… Read more »

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PUBLIC in Pulgria, Italy

We were in Puglia (the heel of the boot of Italy) last month, doing what you do there: eating, roaming around, and checking out the local culture. As with all of Italy you come across contrasts to what you see at home: stone streets, tile floors, ancient towns, small cars, baroque churches, arches, and unique local architecture. But, the standout contrast was the abundance of elderly people (mostly guys) riding bikes and hanging out in public places. They were there in masses in almost every town center.

Civic connections are encouraged by the safety, comfort, and proximity of public spaces in these towns. You cannot drive through the town squares because they are pedestrian only zones. We surmise that most of the senior citizens cannot afford cars, so it’s a blessing really. So simple – bikes serve to help create a strong sense of community and health. The city centers take on a relaxing, convivial, and alive feeling with all the people watching and café hopping. The older folks easily remain connected to the everyday happenings in their town – much more so than relaxing at home or on a stationary bike at the gym.

Puglia is a pretty cool place for travel and biking for anyone. The flat terrain provides great biking roads and there is a cultural respect for cyclists. If you can put together a group of friends for a trip, the Villa Pizzorusso is the place to stay.  Friends of ours run this special place, so it comes highly recommended.

Velo Vino Grand Opening

May 25th, 2011

We are excited to announce that Velo Vino, a new and “unique place where the passions of cycling and wine are celebrated and blended,” will offer visitors a chance to ride PUBLIC bikes through the country roads of Napa Valley.  Join us on Friday, May 27th from 5-9 pm for the Velo Vino grand opening… Read more »

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PUBLIC at Velo Vino

We are excited to announce that Velo Vino, a new and “unique place where the passions of cycling and wine are celebrated and blended,” will offer visitors a chance to ride PUBLIC bikes through the country roads of Napa Valley.  Join us on Friday, May 27th from 5-9 pm for the Velo Vino grand opening with wine, food trucks and live music. RSVP is required to velovino@clifbar.com.

Photo Credits: clubantietam.com (left), Bohemian.com (right)

Hotel San Jose in Austin: A Modern Sense of Place

April 18th, 2011

Making bikes available for guests has become a smart modern amenity, more so than a doorman. You’ll find PUBLIC bikes at an increasing number of

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Making bikes available for guests has become a smart modern amenity, more so than a doorman. You’ll find PUBLIC bikes at an increasing number of cool hotels around the country including the following: Ames Hotel, Boston, Hudson, NYC, James Hotel, NYC, Delano, Miami, Mondrian, South Beach, Shore Club, South Beach, El Cosmico, Marfa, Hotel San Jose, Austin, Verde Camp, Austin, W Hotel, Austin, h2hotel, Healdsburg, and Clift Hotel, San Francisco.

We just stayed at one of “our” hotels last month in Austin Texas, the Hotel San Jose. It stands out in uniqueness and authenticity. With the HSJ it is the sense of place that makes it special and appropriately modern. The very nature of the hotel itself serves as a concierge and ambassador for Austin. A stay here teaches you about the city’s culture. The hotel could not really exist anywhere else, and few modern designer hotels attempt to be so brave.

Hotel San Jose was a 60’s motor court in a dilapidated state when hotel entrepreneur Liz Lambert transformed it into a bohemian chic and Zen Texan oasis.  There are dirt paths, courtyards covered for outdoor dining, and an abundance of trees and shrubs that range from cactus to bamboo.  You hear birds singing throughout the day and forget the fact that you are on Congress avenue, a busy four lane thoroughfare that takes you to central downtown Austin.

Any hotel can have name brand designer furnishings, but not many can have unique furnishings that connect you to the local environment and culture.  The designer elements here are an eclectic mixture of rustic wood, iron, leather and cotton, put together with craftsmen’s touch to create a Spartan casual manner. This might seem self-conscious or out of place nostalgic in a slick city like Dallas or San Francisco. But Austin is quirky, so this it works. It’s a little like being in a ranch bunkhouse, except bunkhouses do not usually offer superb modern bath products – Malin and Goetz soaps and shampoos. There is nothing falsely nostalgic or romantic here.

The hotel guests and visitors include a lot of local and youthful characters that reflect the culture of Austin. The street location is about as friendly as any that exists.  The nearby corner is a local hangout with a Joe’s coffee that serves the highest quality coffee drinks and local fare, like breakfast tacos.  A dozen other shops are within two blocks.  Musicians play and people dance right outside.  The street energy encourages you to stay outside. Austin is one of the many cities recently embracing commuter bicycling. At Hotel San Jose guests are provided with PUBLIC bikes so they can further explore the area.

The Hotel San Jose is a 5 star experience for me because it preserved an authentic character and a sense of place.  Our bikes are very happy there. Go check them out.  Our bikes are also very happy at Mellow Johnny’s, perhaps the most exiting bike store in the country, just down the road from HSJ and another reason to visit Austin.

Which of your favorites hotels do you think should offer PUBLIC bikes to their guests? Feel free to recommend a few in the comments sections below.

Hotels with PUBLIC Bikes

April 16th, 2011

We recommend staying at any of these amazing lifestyle hotels that provide PUBLIC bikes for their guests to explore their surroundings. Clift Hotel in San Francisco, CA: Clift Hotel, a luxury establishment located in downtown San Francisco, envelopes its guests in smoky elegance and velvet charm. A stone’s throw from North Beach, Fishermans’ Wharf and… Read more »

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We recommend staying at any of these amazing lifestyle hotels that provide PUBLIC bikes for their guests to explore their surroundings.

Clift Hotel in San Francisco, CA: Clift Hotel, a luxury establishment located in downtown San Francisco, envelopes its guests in smoky elegance and velvet charm. A stone’s throw from North Beach, Fishermans’ Wharf and the Presidio, Clift Hotel guests can enjoy leisurely biking in PUBLIC’s beloved hometown – they can even ride down and visit us at PUBLIC’s headquarters in South Park.

h2hotel in Healdsburg, CA: “Follow your bliss,” h2hotel tells us, and when we do, our feet lead us to this luxurious LEED-certified hotel located in the heart of Northern Sonoma Wine Country. h2hotel proudly offers PUBLIC bikes as a way to navigate Healdsburg and surrounding vineyards, and has four separate bike trail loops for adventurous and wine-minded guests to tour the countryside.

Delano in South Beach, FL: Famous for its five star service, pool side parties, and exceptional bar, Delano is literally on South Beach and affords guests a difficult choice – to lounge by the shore, or to avail yourself of the beach bike trail and coast your way Downtown? Soak in the sun and ride Delano’s PUBLIC bikes in this South Beach paradise.

El Cosmico in Marfa, TX: A sustainable living concept, El Cosmico lives in the Texas desert and offers guests their choice of vintage trailer, yurt, teepee and tent – not to mention a hammock grove and a rotating calendar of fun clinics and classes. Grab a PUBLIC bike and ride around this sleepy, artsy town. Witness the famous Marfa lights and experience the calming concept of Mañana on your PUBLIC bike vacation.

Hotel San Jose in Austin, TX: Hotel San Jose, the hotel with a soul, trumpets its joy for living in Austin by offering all sorts of soulful details to guests. Features include a hand-picked music and video library, a vintage Remington Premier typewriter for when poetry strikes, Polaroid cameras for capturing Austin moments, and…PUBLIC bikes that can take you touring through South Austin or nearby Barton Springs.

Hudson in NYC, NY: Hudson Hotel, centrally located in Hell’s Kitchen and five minute’s walk from Central Park, takes design seriously and creates an unforgettable guest experience with its personal library, private park and sky terrace. Soak in the ambiance, and then grab a PUBLIC bike to take a leisurely spin through Central Park on your way to soak up some more New York City culture at the Museum of Natural History and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Mondrian SoHo in New York City, NY: Mondrian SoHo is a flavorful experience for connoisseurs of culture as well as cuisine. Chef Sam Talbot heads in-house restaurant Imperial No. Nine, a sustainable seafood concept, not to mention a visual and culinary delight. Guests can check out a PUBLIC bike and ride through nearby Little Italy and Chinatown,

Mondrian South Beach in South Beach, FL: Nothing says luxury like a chandelier in the shower. Except maybe a private island. Explore Mondrian South Beach’s lush private island, soak in Miami’s downtown skyline at the Sunset Lounge, and then indulge yourself in the ultimate two-wheeled luxury by jumping on a PUBLIC bike to explore the beach and hotel grounds.

Shore Club in South Beach, FL: Shore Club exudes old-world Miami charm, inviting its guests to wake up to gorgeous beach vistas and the soothing sound of waves. A taste of old-world Tuscany charm is available at restaurant Ago, and Chef Nobu Matsuhisa’s Japanese cuisine empire can be sampled at restaurant Nobu. Work up an appetite for these international treats on a PUBLIC bike.

The James Hotel in New York, NY: The James Hotel New York, conveniently situated in SoHo and a quick PUBLIC bike ride to three parks – Juan Pable Duarte Square, Cavala Park, and St. John’s Park – is a lovely place to kick back and enjoy the details. Explore the Urban Garden, and then sample its Chef’s Herbs at the David Burke Kitchen. Cap off your busy day of riding with a drink at Jimmy, the rooftop bar with a 360-degree view of the Manhattan skyline.

The James Hotel in Chicago, IL: The James Chicago offers a stylish and engaging alternative for the contemporary business or leisure traveler. The James is ideally situated right in the heart of downtown Chicago, just steps from Michigan Avenue. In addition to its proximity to numerous dining, shopping and nightlife choices along the world famous Magnificent Mile, The James is within easy walking distance of such celebrated cultural attractions as Millennium Park and The Museum of Contemporary Art.

Verde Camp in Austin, TX: Beautifully furnished, eco-friendly Camp Verde in Austin invites you on a PUBLIC bike ride through its fair city. Hop on a PUBLIC bike and pedal your way towards cupcakes, cafes, uncommon objects, art galleries, tacos, dress costumes, pizza and  ice cream. It will be tough deciding how best to divide your time between Camp Verde and the rest of Austin, but a PUBLIC bike will make the ride a blast.

W Hotel Austin in Austin, TX: What’s that sound? You won’t have to go far to follow your ears; nestled at the heart of Austin’s music happenings, W is poised to offer guests a hopping live music neighborhood scene. W is also a quick PUBLIC bike ride to Lady Bird Lake Trail, where you’ll take in views of Disch Field, Town Lake Park, and Zilker Botanical Garden, not to mention lovely views of Lady Bird Lake itself.

Ames Hotel in Boston, MA: Only five minutes walking distance from Boston Common, Ames Hotel is conveniently situated in the heart of historic Boston. Elegant and urban, Ames Hotel is the perfect launching point for a PUBLIC bike tour of lovely Boston on the Freedom Trail, and along the Boston Waterfront and the Boston Esplanade. The Cape Cod Rail Trail is a 22-mile day trip and a wonderful way to soak in Cape scenery. Bikers can pedal away knowing that the comfort and luxury of Ames is close by at the end of a day.

Tribeca Grand Hotel in New York City, NY: Tribeca Grand appreciates that good taste is as much a product of well-articulated design as it is of historic location; this affinity for design turns a stroll through the spacious atrium into a walk through a Hitchcock mid-20th century Penn Station set. Tribeca Grand guests can request ipods to explore the city with soulfully arranged New York soundtracks, meet their new pet goldfish through the hotel’s signature goldfish program, and best of all, borrow a PUBLIC bike to ride around town in style.

Symbols of Change in Washington DC

March 23rd, 2011

The two best pieces of design in Washington DC are the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the new Capital Bikeshare program. They actually share some qualities and characteristics other than the fact that they are located in the heart of the nation’s capitol. Initially, both the memorial and bike share were met with skepticism. Now they… Read more »

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Vietnam Veterans Memorial and Capital Bike Share

Photo Credits: Rob Forbes (left), John Hill (right)

The two best pieces of design in Washington DC are the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the new Capital Bikeshare program. They actually share some qualities and characteristics other than the fact that they are located in the heart of the nation’s capitol. Initially, both the memorial and bike share were met with skepticism. Now they are both positive symbols of vision and change.

Earlier this month we were in the nation’s capitol for the annual National Bike Summit. US Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, Congressman Earl Blumenauer, and NYC Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan were among the noteworthy spokespeople who gave talks.  The overarching message was this: “ Positive change is coming to US transportation policy, but don’t wait for Washington DC to make it happen. Take action in your own communities. Our mayors and locally elected officials make the important local land use decisions that determine how our communities are designed and developed.

Washington DC has good reason to direct people back to their communities. It is one example of what’s gone wrong with US cities. A recent Financial Times article sums up the issues, Commuting: Best of Both Worlds? by Jurek Martin, Lucy Warwick-Ching, and Enid Tsui.

“Washington DC, the nation’s capital, last in baseball, is a perennial contender, along with Los Angeles, for the prize of the worst commuter traffic in the US (public transport use is up, though still spotty in its reach).” -Jurek Martin, Financial Times

DC Traffic and Capital Bike Share

Photo Credits: Jacquelyn Martin, Associated Press (left), Rob Forbes (right)

How is it that our nation’s capitol does not embody a model for modern transportation solutions with efficient transit in all forms? DC has not always been a laggard. When the DC Metro was built in 1976 it turned heads. It was slick, quiet, clean, and modeled after the elegant Parisian Metro. It was a hugely optimistic venture that reflected well on our democratic values – comfortable, safe, affordable transportation for everyone. It was a great symbol for the US.

What slowed the progress since then? Why was an affordable transit link between DC’s airport and the city not been planned until recently? What do tourists and foreign dignitaries think when they sit in traffic around the beltway? As I experienced the traffic snarl on my way from the airport, this was on my mind. How do we get people to think differently about mobility? What are some examples of progressive visions coming from DC? One great example dawned on me right there on the Capitol Mall, The Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

In 1982 when the Vietnam Veterans Memorial first went up controversy stirred the air. Traditionalists did not like it. It seemed un-American and the visionary artist Maya Lin had an Asian surname, causing misguided angst for some people.  For centuries men in uniform on horses putting flags in the ground defined the form of American monuments.  This low-lying dark wall of names seemed entirely inappropriate or heretical to many. But when it was unveiled, it won almost everyone over. It is one of the boldest and most provocative designs in Washington DC. An impressive and courageous jury of designers selected the winning design by Maya Lin. Politicians with guts and a vision accomplished this monumental change.

DC now has a new bike share system called Capital Bikeshare. It is the best bike share system I’ve experienced yet – more simple and easy than the Paris and Barcelona systems. Minimal, smart, red bikes in pristine shape can be found almost anywhere you’d need them. But like the Maya Lin piece, it was initially controversial. Bike transportation asks us to challenge conventions of the past. The Capital Bikeshare system is bold, visual, and impossible to ignore. Just as Maya Lin pushed the boundaries of American monuments, the bike share program in DC pushes the limits of how one can move through the city. It may seem anti- American to some who are stuck in the old car-centric ways. By expanding mobility choices, the bike share program offers individuals an easy opportunity to take action themselves and make an immediate difference. We hope that the new bike share system can earn the same symbolic value of the Maya Lin over the years.

A PUBLIC Offer from h2hotel

March 15th, 2011

One of our favorite getaways is h2hotel in Healdsburg, CA. Just a short drive away from San Francisco, it is a perfect place to get away in the heart of Sonoma wine country. h2hotel is offering PUBLIC fans a $25 dining or spa credit for every night booked. To take advantage of this offer, click… Read more »

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h2hotel

One of our favorite getaways is h2hotel in Healdsburg, CA. Just a short drive away from San Francisco, it is a perfect place to get away in the heart of Sonoma wine country.

h2hotel is offering PUBLIC fans a $25 dining or spa credit for every night booked. To take advantage of this offer, click on this link.

Several PUBLIC team members have stayed at h2hotel.  We love its eco-design and central access to fine restaurants. Even better, we don’t have to bring our bikes because h2hotel has a fleet of PUBLIC bikes. Guests can enjoying biking around town and through the exquisite wine country roads.

h2hotel is the first hotel to offer guests PUBLIC bikes. We’re excited that other fine hotels have followed the lead of h2hotel.

If you’ve got a favorite hotel you think should offer PUBLIC bikes for their guests, let us know.

Austin to Portland: The World’s Best Bikes

February 11th, 2011

Few people realize that the United States is the recognized world leader in handmade bikes. There are pockets of tradition and expertise of this craft in New England and in the Pacific Northwest. But there are skilled independent makers in almost every urban area around the US.  Viewing these bikes all in one place is… Read more »

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Few people realize that the United States is the recognized world leader in handmade bikes. There are pockets of tradition and expertise of this craft in New England and in the Pacific Northwest. But there are skilled independent makers in almost every urban area around the US.  Viewing these bikes all in one place is a real challenge, but this is changing.  There are terrific events coming up this year that you should know about: the North American Handmade Bike Show (NAHBS) in Austin on Feb 25-27, and the Oregon Manifest in Portland on September 23-24. Each of these events will help to elevate this craft to its rightful status.

North American Handmade Bicycle Show Austin, February 23-24
The annual NAHBS show travels to different locations around the country every year. This year it will take place in Austin, Texas. We attended our first one in Portland back in 2008.  Our past Men in Pink blog post highlights the experience. You will see the finest contemporary handmade bikes in the world. The show is small enough that you can talk and hang out with the makers.  While in Austin, stop by the amazing Mellow Johnny’s, one of the greatest bike shops in the US where you can check out and test ride PUBLIC bikes. Just riding around this bike centric town is fun.

Oregon Manifest, Utility Bikes Meet Design, Portland, September 23-24
Back in 2009 we participated in the first ever Oregon Manifest as a juror, so we know it well. In its second year the show has grown to such a level where they have even invited three internationally recognized design firms – IDEO, Fuseproject, and ZIBA – to collaborate with bike builders. The challenge is to create the ideal transportation bike (further testimony to the fact that utility bikes are coming of age).  Credit Portland for being a Mecca for bikes and such a driving force for bike culture in America.   Bring a bike and explore a great American city where 10% of the population and the Mayor ride daily. Here are the guidelines and more on this show.

Copenhagen: Where the Mayor does not wear a bike helmet

August 10th, 2010

Copenhagen Mayor Frank Jensen (right) Danish “World Cup” helmets Denmark has a long tradition of helmets and head protection used for battling wartime opponents and confronting freezing winters. So they must know their stuff about protecting noggins. When we visited Copenhagen last month we took note that only a minority of the cyclists wore bike… Read more »

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Mayors and HelmetsCopenhagen Mayor Frank Jensen (right)

Mayors and HelmetsDanish “World Cup” helmets

Mayors and HelmetsMayors and HelmetsMayors and helmets

Denmark has a long tradition of helmets and head protection used for battling wartime opponents and confronting freezing winters. So they must know their stuff about protecting noggins. When we visited Copenhagen last month we took note that only a minority of the cyclists wore bike helmets in the city. We saw Nutcase helmets on kids, racing helmets on bike messengers, and some chic hats on women’s heads. But scarves were more common than helmets. The Mayor himself, the figurehead for the biking conference we attended, chose not to wear a helmet in the 2000 person bike parade we all took through the city.

Was he making a statement? Of course, he is a politician after all and very conscious of his public image and opinions. I did not interview him, but I can wager his rationale. He has reviewed the data over the last ten years in Copenhagen enough to know that bike safety is first and foremost a function of the number of people riding bikes and protected streets. He was campaigning to reduce the fear element associated with cycling. Many people think that cycling is unsafe and helmets often confirm this assumption. He was communicating what recent urban bike studies have shown — there is safety in numbers.

Serious injuries have declined by 20% in Denmark in the last decade as cycling has increased 20%. The same trends are seen in other cities. Take New York for a local example. Cycling is up 66% from 2007 -2009 and injuries are down 50%.

The key to safe riding is related to a range of factors: the number of riders overall, driver awareness, separate lanes, safe streets, and intelligent riding. At PUBLIC we are advocates for the concept of urban cycling as fast walking. The most entertaining dissertation I have read on helmet usage may be in David Byrne’s book and come from his personal efforts to cope with this issue.

Back to Mayors. Would Mayor Gavin Newsom ride a bike without a helmet? Probably not. Why? In the U.S., the infrastructure and culture for bicycling is far behind places like Copenhagen, so helmet use is generally encouraged.  Also driver awareness and respect here in the U.S. are much lower.  But Mayor Newsom was front and center today right in our SOMA neighborhood for a bike lane painting ceremony to mark the end of the painful injunction that has kept us in the dark ages.  Check him out painting the new bike lane. Now San Francisco can roll with the rest of the U.S. 
We love to see our Mayors taking action around the country on behalf of alternative transit. Mayor Bloomberg of New York, with Janette Sadik- Kahn, has been the poster child in recent years. But Mayor Daley of Chicago recently implemented the B-Cycle bike share program, throwing down the gauntlet: 



“My goal is to make Chicago the most bicycle-friendly city in the United States.”
 


We welcome the competitive spirit almost as much as new bike lanes.

– Rob Forbes

 

PUBLIC Helmet

We sell helmets at PUBLIC, and we love them. And we encourage people to wear protection if they are riding fast, in dangerous areas, or where cars propose a threat. That Danish Mayor probably straps on a helmet when he is late for a meeting across town and biking over icy pavement. But we will also continue to lobby for safe streets, slow riding, driver education, and more Mayors on bikes.