The Sierra Club Meets Chicago

August 18th, 2011

What do the Sierra Club and Moving Design of Chicago have in common? City bicycling is getting support from an ever-increasing eclectic list of organizations. Every month it seems we partner with some cool group working to encourage more people to incorporate a bicycle into their daily urban lives. This month we’re working with two… Read more »

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Sierra Club Meets Chicago

What do the Sierra Club and Moving Design of Chicago have in common?

City bicycling is getting support from an ever-increasing eclectic list of organizations. Every month it seems we partner with some cool group working to encourage more people to incorporate a bicycle into their daily urban lives.

This month we’re working with two very unique groups, The Sierra Club, one of the largest national environmental advocacy organizations, and Moving Design, a small design-based group in Chicago.  Both groups use their unique skills to encourage people to rethink the way we get around in our communities and to reduce our dependency on cars and fossil fuels.

The Sierra Club
Founded in 1892 by John Muir, The Sierra Club has over a million members and supporters and is one of most influential grassroots organizations in the United States. They literally defined environmental activism for many of us. The Sierra Club is giving away three PUBLIC bikes to encourage more people to leave their cars at home. You can enter to win by going to The Sierra Club website or visiting The Sierra Club Facebook page.

The Sierra Club also created a video, with help from our friends at Agency Charlie, to showcase how someone can move around their community by bicycle instead of a car.

Two Mornings from Sierra Club National on Vimeo.

We all recognize that we need our cities to become more livable and dense in population in order to reduce urban sprawl and protect our environment. We’re happy to team up with The Sierra Club to invite more people to make a difference on city streets.  While our partnership with The Sierra Club may not have the same dramatic effect on our environment as NYC Mayor Bloomberg’s recent $50 million gift to The Sierra Club to reduce coal consumption, we’re happy to do our part.

Moving Design
Founded in 2010 by renowned graphic designer Rick Valicenti, Moving Design is pushing a number of civic-minded community based projects in Chicago. They hosted an event this week in Chicago where City Planner Adolfo Hernandez and PUBLIC Founder Rob Forbes made presentations on urban bicycling and the progress to make Chicago streets more livable.

Chicago has been an international leader in urban architecture dating back a century. In recent years they have again launched themselves into international prominence with the development of Millennium Park, which includes the fantastic Anish Kapoor Cloud Gate (aka “The Bean”), the Jaume Plensa Crown Fountain video sculpture, the Lurie Garden, and the Jay Pritzker Pavillion designed by Frank Gehry in Grant Park.  Former Chicago Mayor Daley and the spirited civic-minded community can be credited for these monumental achievements. We rode by these projects and the lakeshore as we biked around Chicago this week.  See photos.  We hope new Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and groups like Moving Design continue to make Chicago an example of a modern livable city with blue bike lanes across the city.

Moving Design Call to Action

August 11th, 2011

Moving Design is an creative activist group doing some amazing things in Chicago such as transforming Logan Square into a hub for safe, active mobility, where pedestrians and bikers rule. Logan Square will serve as a model for other neighborhoods. The goal is to improve the quality of life, public safety and health, and community… Read more »

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Moving Design Call to Action
Moving Design is an creative activist group doing some amazing things in Chicago such as transforming Logan Square into a hub for safe, active mobility, where pedestrians and bikers rule. Logan Square will serve as a model for other neighborhoods. The goal is to improve the quality of life, public safety and health, and community cohesion across the city. Rob Forbes, PUBLIC Founder, and Adolfo Hernandez, Director of Outreach & Advocacy at Active Transportation Alliance will be speaking. Come join us on August 15th at 6:30 pm at Wright (1440 W. Hubbard St.). The event is sponsored by Moving Design and VSA Partners and is open to the public – tickets are $10.

An Invitation to Wear Heels

June 1st, 2011

“Oftentimes people will ask if it is hard to ride a bike in heels. It’s not,” Lauren Gerrie says. “In fact, it makes wearing heels that much easier because your feet hurt less from not having to walk around. I put together my outfits based around the assumption that I will be riding my bike…. Read more »

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SHOES
“Oftentimes people will ask if it is hard to ride a bike in heels. It’s not,” Lauren Gerrie says. “In fact, it makes wearing heels that much easier because your feet hurt less from not having to walk around. I put together my outfits based around the assumption that I will be riding my bike. This opens my world of options up tenfold. I tell you what, a girl cannot stand/walk around this city in 4″ stilettos for that long, but she sure as hell can ride in them for hours on end.”

Until the recent resurgence of the everyday bicycle, bicycling in the United States has primarily focused on performance and recreation. It’s more diversely utilized in other parts of the world.

At PUBLIC, we focus on bicycling as transportation – as a simple and elegant vehicle for joy and getting around our communities. Our vision is a world where more of our public spaces are reclaimed for walking and bicycling.

We welcome everyone, regardless of his or her footwear, to ride a bicycle daily. You can dress in casual or business attire, and wear heels, tennis shoes, flip flops, or just about anything while riding our PUBLIC bikes. We appreciate a combination of practicality, style, health, and fashion.

The City – Our Greatest Invention

May 25th, 2011

Ideally our cities become exciting, sexy, and profitable places to live, play, and work – that’s the most important part. When people have no investment in the places they play or work or live, they act accordingly. – David Byrne I plucked this David Byrne quote from the recent Momentum issue. If you are not familiar… Read more »

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Ideally our cities become exciting, sexy, and profitable places to live, play, and work – that’s the most important part. When people have no investment in the places they play or work or live, they act accordingly. – David Byrne

Momentum David Byrne

Momentum Magazine, 5.2011

Public Space Chicago

Chicago

Public Space 1

Barcelona

Public Space 2

Salamanca

Public Space 3

Milan

I plucked this David Byrne quote from the recent Momentum issue. If you are not familiar with Momentum, a magazine about urban cycling, check it out.  It improves with every issue and is a good barometer of positive change in our cities.

In general David Byrne is not known for his use of words like “investment” and “profitable.” We have written about his interests before. He has been an urban bicyclist long enough to realize that the change we need in our cities requires all of us to think a little differently. There are complicated issues like density, taxes, aesthetics, and policies that need the support of constituencies.  How do we make cities friendlier to businesses that ensure a healthy tax basis? Can we get car commuters to cover the real costs of their use of city streets and parking spaces? How do we undo over fifty years of deterioration of sidewalks and public spaces? Or make all parts of the city safe and productive places for their residents? Harvard Professor and author Edward Glaeser offers some solutions.

Compared to many cities around the world, we have a general lack of civic connectedness in the United States. The reasons for this are not particularly mysterious. The way many of us move through our cities is by car. Cars are by their nature isolating private spaces that shield us from the realities (both positive and negative) of our urban environment. For instance, ghettos are often easy to quickly drive through or around. Cars keep us from making eye contact with our neighbors and noticing the little details of our immediate surroundings. Yes, New York is an exception – nearly everyone there gets a pedestrian-eye-view of their surroundings, and as a result (I think) the inhabitants are fiercely proud (even defensive) of their city and its neighborhoods. Walking and bicycling heightens awareness and invites specificity.

A recent book by Harvard Professor Edward Glaeser, Triumph of the City discusses the development of the modern city and its relevance with a fresh and unique perspective. Perhaps you saw him interviewed on the Daily Show. The very definition of cities is discussed.

“Cities are the absence of physical space between people and companies. They are proximity, density, closeness. They enable us to work and play together, and their success depends on the demand for physical connection.” – Edward Glaeser.

Provocative chapters, like “What’s Good About Slums” and “Is There Anything Greener Than Blacktop” challenge our basic assumptions about environmental policies. The cities profiled include all continents and range from Rio de Janeiro to Bangalore to Atlanta to Milan. This is a rich fast paced read that celebrates the value of human capital, which is what ultimately makes a city great.

Celebrate May 16-20 Bike to Work Week

May 12th, 2011

Bike to Work Day (BTWD) hit SF today with passion. We kicked the day off by donating two bikes to our local Public Broadcasting station KQED for a BTWD raffle. This helped KQED take in over $175,000 in pledges and set a new record. Wow. Bike to Work Day was a big deal for us… Read more »

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Biking to Work
Bike to Work Day (BTWD) hit SF today with passion. We kicked the day off by donating two bikes to our local Public Broadcasting station KQED for a BTWD raffle. This helped KQED take in over $175,000 in pledges and set a new record. Wow.

Bike to Work Day was a big deal for us in San Francisco yesterday. Our Mayor Ed Lee and many elected officials rode to work with groups of bicyclists from their neighborhoods. It all culminated in a fun celebration and brief speeches on the steps of City Hall. I rode to the event down Polk Street with the President of the Board of Supervisors David Chiu to greet a big crowd at City Hall.

Mayor Lee
Mayor Ed Lee
David ChiuPresident of the Board of Supervisors David Chiu

It’s amazing to live in a city where almost every elected official wants to participate and share their plans to improve bicycling in their city. There is an overall commitment to dramatically expand the network of bike-friendly thoroughfares throughout the city and to make San Francisco a national model of the new modern city where pedestrians and bicyclists reclaim some of the sidewalks and streets from cars.

The 12,000+ member San Francisco Bicycle Coalition was repeatedly acknowledged for their leadership in this movement and we were delighted to see their fearless leader Leah Shahum riding a PUBLIC M8 to the event. We also encourage you to participate in the BTWD events throughout the US this month and support your hometown bike advocacy organization to help make your cities a more livable place for everyone.

Leah and a PUBLIC M8Leah with a PUBLIC M8
City Hall CrowdCity Hall Crowd

Commuting Diaries (Bike to Work Day)

May 10th, 2011

May is National Bike Month. Bike to Work Week is May 16-20 and Bike to Work Day is Friday, May 20. PUBLIC offers bikes that don’t compromise function for style. You can have both with a PUBLIC bike. But no matter how good you look and feel while riding, you should pay attention to general… Read more »

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Bike to Work

May is National Bike Month. Bike to Work Week is May 16-20 and Bike to Work Day is Friday, May 20.

PUBLIC offers bikes that don’t compromise function for style. You can have both with a PUBLIC bike. But no matter how good you look and feel while riding, you should pay attention to general rules of the road.

The League of American Bicyclist has “six Rules of the Road will prepare you for a safe and fun bike commute this Bike Month” –

1. FOLLOW THE LAW. Your safety and the image of bicyclists depend on you.

2. BE PREDICTABLE. Make your intentions clear to motorists and other road users.

3. BE CONSPICUOUS. Ride where drivers can see you.

4. THINK AHEAD. Anticipate what drivers, pedestrians, and other bicyclists will do next.

5. RIDE READY. Check your tires have sufficient air, brakes are working, chain runs smoothly, and quick release wheel levers are closed.

6. KEEP YOUR COOL. Road rage benefits no-one and always makes a bad situation worse.

Our PUBLIC team loves biking to work. We pedal through San Francisco and savor city details from behind our bicycle handlebars. On good weather days, we arrive at our South Park office refreshed by sunshine and cool breezes.

In honor of this month’s Bike to Work Day, we’d like to share our bike commutes with you.

Brenna
Brenna’s Bike Ride: Lake Merritt to South Park. 40 minutes.
I hop on my bike and coast down the hill to Lake Merritt, where I cruise the shoreline and admire the water. Lake Merritt’s particular shade of blue changes from day to day – on grey days it’s opaque and stately, and on sunny days it sparkles and winks. A quick BART ride to the city, and I’m off, admiring the bay view along Embarcadero. I turn my head to watch the water and the bridge and the sky chatting expansively in shades of blue. Before I know it, I’m doing a quick lap of green South Park and I’m ready for my day at PUBLIC.
Alan
Alan’s Bike Ride: Inner Richmond to South Park. 45 minutes.
I bike a small piece of paradise when I ride past USF’s Lone Mountain campus. There’s a cathedral on the hill, and I like saying hello to the palm trees. I also pass City Hall and enjoy riding by the local craft market in UN Plaza, where I play a game of picking which crazy hat I’d try on if I had time to stop. Some days, I treat myself by going out of my way to pass through a slightly larger piece of paradise in the Panhandle. Not only is it flat, green and beautiful, it’s a thoroughfare for other bike commuters, and it’s nice to see everyone out on their bikes.
Dawn2
Dawn’s Bike Ride: Inner Mission to South Park. 20 minutes.
I take my dog Riley to work with me, and our day starts with a breezy 20-minute commute to the office. Riley sits in a red crate on my front rack, and together we enjoy feeling the wind in our faces. I mainly cruise down Division, which is a great commuting street because of the new bike lanes. My favorite part of my short ride is passing through a little traffic circle right before hitting the design area. It has some plants and it’s been nice to watch them growing greener every day this Spring. Riley loves riding in his red crate even more than he loves sticking his head out the car window, and I think we both love it a hundred times more than navigating a bus. Getting to work in the morning is fun, fast and outdoors – I don’t know what more I could ask for in a commute.

PUBLIC Bikes: Design Matters

May 2nd, 2011

PUBLIC’s founder Rob Forbes, who also founded Design Within Reach, shares his thoughts about why design matters and the vision behind PUBLIC. PUBLIC is a San Francisco-based bicycle and gear company with our store and headquarters in 123 South Park. We design and sell urban bikes, along with accessories to make riding more enjoyable, practical,… Read more »

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PUBLIC’s founder Rob Forbes, who also founded Design Within Reach, shares his thoughts about why design matters and the vision behind PUBLIC.

PUBLIC is a San Francisco-based bicycle and gear company with our store and headquarters in 123 South Park. We design and sell urban bikes, along with accessories to make riding more enjoyable, practical, and chic. Our European-inspired bikes ride like butter. They come in single and multi-speeds in all sizes. You can dress in casual or business attire, and wear pumps, tennis shoes, or flip flops – just about anything – while riding our bikes. And we have baskets, bags and other gear to go along with them. These bikes will make you feel like a kid again, and this is every bit as important as anything else. All of our products can be ordered online. Or find PUBLIC bikes at these locations in the US and Canada.

Three Fun Gigs for Local Models, Photographers, Writers

April 5th, 2011

PUBLIC Models PUBLIC is seeking models for a lifestyle photo shoot that will feature our new bikes, hats, shoes, and other gear.  We are looking for “real people,” rather than professional models, who are comfortable in front of a camera and on a bike. If you are local and have a somewhat flexible schedule, please… Read more »

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PUBLIC Casting Call for Models

PUBLIC Models
PUBLIC is seeking models for a lifestyle photo shoot that will feature our new bikes, hats, shoes, and other gear.  We are looking for “real people,” rather than professional models, who are comfortable in front of a camera and on a bike. If you are local and have a somewhat flexible schedule, please send us a brief note and a high resolution photo to models@publicbikes.com.  Check out the websites Copenhagen Cycle Chic and The Sartorialist to see what we’re after.

Compensation will be a $100 merchandise credit, plus coffee, snacks, and good humor during the shoot. This modeling gig is more about coming out for fun than about fame. The photos will be used on our website and possibly in a brochure, poster, or magazine. The date and time are weather dependant and TBD but may include an evening.

PUBLIC Video Stars
Do you already own a PUBLIC bike? Come share what you love about biking in the city in a two minute filmed interview.  We plan to publish these fun, casual, spontaneous, and genuine customer interviews on our website. Our first video shoot is planned for Thursday, April 14th. If you are available anytime between 11:00-7:00 please send an email to videos@publicbikes.com. If you can’t make it on Thursday, send us an email to let us know you are interested.  We will plan other video shoots soon. There is a small gift for everyone who participates.

Photographers and Writers for a New Book
Our friend, author Gary Boulanger is writing a book titled Where to Bike San Francisco. This new guidebook about road and bike path bicycling in the Bay Area will be published in late 2011. The book will feature 83 rides (53 adult, 30 family/kids) in color, with four pages dedicated to each ride, including photos, maps, and historical references. Gary will be riding each selected route with a GPS unit, a notebook, and a camera to compile the highlights of each ride in the four regions: San Francisco, Marin County, Berkeley/East Bay, and the Peninsula.

He’s asking for Bay Area cyclists to submit a maximum of four photos that were taken in the designated areas. Winners receive up to $300 and a chance to be published.  Here is a press release describing the book and photo contest in greater detail.  Submit your high-resolution photos to wheretobikeSF@gmail.com.

Symbols of Change in Washington DC

March 23rd, 2011

The two best pieces of design in Washington DC are the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the new Capital Bikeshare program. They actually share some qualities and characteristics other than the fact that they are located in the heart of the nation’s capitol. Initially, both the memorial and bike share were met with skepticism. Now they… Read more »

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Vietnam Veterans Memorial and Capital Bike Share

Photo Credits: Rob Forbes (left), John Hill (right)

The two best pieces of design in Washington DC are the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the new Capital Bikeshare program. They actually share some qualities and characteristics other than the fact that they are located in the heart of the nation’s capitol. Initially, both the memorial and bike share were met with skepticism. Now they are both positive symbols of vision and change.

Earlier this month we were in the nation’s capitol for the annual National Bike Summit. US Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, Congressman Earl Blumenauer, and NYC Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan were among the noteworthy spokespeople who gave talks.  The overarching message was this: “ Positive change is coming to US transportation policy, but don’t wait for Washington DC to make it happen. Take action in your own communities. Our mayors and locally elected officials make the important local land use decisions that determine how our communities are designed and developed.

Washington DC has good reason to direct people back to their communities. It is one example of what’s gone wrong with US cities. A recent Financial Times article sums up the issues, Commuting: Best of Both Worlds? by Jurek Martin, Lucy Warwick-Ching, and Enid Tsui.

“Washington DC, the nation’s capital, last in baseball, is a perennial contender, along with Los Angeles, for the prize of the worst commuter traffic in the US (public transport use is up, though still spotty in its reach).” -Jurek Martin, Financial Times

DC Traffic and Capital Bike Share

Photo Credits: Jacquelyn Martin, Associated Press (left), Rob Forbes (right)

How is it that our nation’s capitol does not embody a model for modern transportation solutions with efficient transit in all forms? DC has not always been a laggard. When the DC Metro was built in 1976 it turned heads. It was slick, quiet, clean, and modeled after the elegant Parisian Metro. It was a hugely optimistic venture that reflected well on our democratic values – comfortable, safe, affordable transportation for everyone. It was a great symbol for the US.

What slowed the progress since then? Why was an affordable transit link between DC’s airport and the city not been planned until recently? What do tourists and foreign dignitaries think when they sit in traffic around the beltway? As I experienced the traffic snarl on my way from the airport, this was on my mind. How do we get people to think differently about mobility? What are some examples of progressive visions coming from DC? One great example dawned on me right there on the Capitol Mall, The Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

In 1982 when the Vietnam Veterans Memorial first went up controversy stirred the air. Traditionalists did not like it. It seemed un-American and the visionary artist Maya Lin had an Asian surname, causing misguided angst for some people.  For centuries men in uniform on horses putting flags in the ground defined the form of American monuments.  This low-lying dark wall of names seemed entirely inappropriate or heretical to many. But when it was unveiled, it won almost everyone over. It is one of the boldest and most provocative designs in Washington DC. An impressive and courageous jury of designers selected the winning design by Maya Lin. Politicians with guts and a vision accomplished this monumental change.

DC now has a new bike share system called Capital Bikeshare. It is the best bike share system I’ve experienced yet – more simple and easy than the Paris and Barcelona systems. Minimal, smart, red bikes in pristine shape can be found almost anywhere you’d need them. But like the Maya Lin piece, it was initially controversial. Bike transportation asks us to challenge conventions of the past. The Capital Bikeshare system is bold, visual, and impossible to ignore. Just as Maya Lin pushed the boundaries of American monuments, the bike share program in DC pushes the limits of how one can move through the city. It may seem anti- American to some who are stuck in the old car-centric ways. By expanding mobility choices, the bike share program offers individuals an easy opportunity to take action themselves and make an immediate difference. We hope that the new bike share system can earn the same symbolic value of the Maya Lin over the years.

Fifteen Women Who Rule the Biking World

March 16th, 2011

All right, so women don’t really “rule” the biking world as the title suggests, but something is definitely going on.  At PUBLIC many of our customers are women and we have many on our staff – so it’s altogether fitting and proper for us to acknowledge National Women’s History Month. Recently The Daily Beast asked… Read more »

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Women Who Rule the Biking World

Photo Credits (clockwise from top left): Unknown, Rad-Spannerei, Unknown, John Von Pamer, Randy Harris, Dustin Jensonn

All right, so women don’t really “rule” the biking world as the title suggests, but something is definitely going on.  At PUBLIC many of our customers are women and we have many on our staff – so it’s altogether fitting and proper for us to acknowledge National Women’s History Month.

Recently The Daily Beast asked me to contribute a piece on meaningful developments in the US biking industry. The editor couldn’t help but notice the recent media attention on bicycles and assumed that there must be some technological advancement behind it. I came to the conclusion that the opposite was the case. The wave of new bicyclists seen on the streets has almost nothing to do with new technologies.  It has everything to do with the bike being repurposed and rediscovered for daily social activity, health, fashion, community, local culture, and general well being.  As a result, women from all walks of life are participating in the biking movement, and in some places they are the most influential bicycle advocates.

Guys World

Eurobike, A Guys World?, photo by Rob Forbes

The prominent role that women play in the industry may not always be immediately obvious. If you judged by the percentage of guys working in bike stores, managing bike companies, or attending bike shows it would appear that the biking industry is like the auto industry; largely a man’s world. But dig a little deeper and you’ll see that women today are driving many of the major changes in the industry and advocacy, especially in the realm of how bikes fit into our communities with social purpose. This tradition of modern urban advocacy begins with Jane Jacobs who is something like the Mother Theresa of the Livable Cities movement. Her seminal book The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961) is a classic read for all students of urban design and a textbook on why grassroots efforts are needed to keep our communities in tact.  She goes at the top of my list of women who make a difference.

Here is my list of fifteen women who are making a significant and positive difference today. It’s constructed of only women I’ve met (with the exception of Audrey Hepburn), so is thoroughly personal and absolutely incomplete.   Please bring other names to our attention and we’ll make them PUBLIC.

Janette Sadik-Kahn
Sadik-Kahn is the current Transportation Commissioner of New York. Her work extends beyond the NYC city limits, as she is recognized internationally for improving the rights of pedestrians and bicyclists. In 2010 we sat down with her for an interview.

Barbara Bigolin
As the CEO of Selle Royale, Bigolin took the company to the next level by bringing together the finest and most legendary names in bike accessory design: Brooks, Selle Royale, Fizik, and Crank Brothers.  At the recent Eurobike show, her new high performance racing shoes under the Fizik brand were the most inspiring new piece of product design.

Carol Coletta
Coletta is the CEO of CEOs for Cities and a powerful advocate for the Livable Cities movement. Follow her on Twitter to appreciate her contributions.

Leah Shahum
As the head of the San Francisco Bike Coalition with over 12,000 members, Shahum is a tireless advocate for improving the biking infrastructure of San Francisco and an eloquent spokesperson for urban biking.

Ulrike Saade
A legend in the biking world of Germany, Saade heads up the world-class European bicycling movement.  Recently she led the VeloBerlin exhibition business operations and on-site organization.  Test your German with this YouTube.

Mia Kohout and Tania Lo
Momentum, the bicycle lifestyle magazine, transpired from the publishers, Kohout’s and Lo’s dream to shift transportation culture in North America from car-centricity to a balance of public transportation, appropriate car use, walking and bicycling.

Vanessa Marie Robinson
A Brooklyn-based designer shares her love of bicycles on the blog, For the Love of Bikes.  Robinson’s design eye and inspirational visions of bike friendly cities align well with PUBLIC’s mission.

Sky Yaeger
During her time as Product Manager at Bianchi from 1990 to 2006, Yaeger helped spark the fixed gear movement with her work on the influential pista design. Her designs for Swobo established a fresh point of view in the city biking scene.  Here is a great interview with Yaeger.

Christena Mackay Gibbs
Gibbs owns the hip Manifesto Bikes in Oakland – a rallying point for urban riding in the Bay Area.

Julie Hirschfeld
Hirschfeld is the owner of Adeline Adeline, a NYC bike shop that has brought the Manhattan fashion world into bicycling culture.

Circe Sher
Sher added a new spin to the hospitality industry in Sonoma.  Her hotel, h2hotel includes bicycles among the basic amenities offered to its guests during their stay. h2hotel is offering PUBLIC fans a $25 dining or spa credit for every night booked by clicking this link.

Liz Lambert
Lambert started Bunkhouse Management, an Austin based company that developed several of the most unique boutique hotels in the world, each of which provide bikes for their guests.

Missy Park
Title Nine is an online retailer of women’s gear that aims to bring functional, athletic apparel to every day use.  Park’s background in biking led her to start up Title Nine.

Shelia Moon
Biking is not just for spandex clad athletes.  With fashion and function equally in mind Shelia Moon started the cycling apparel outfitter, Shelia Moon.

Audrey Hepburn
We just like to get a photo of her in wherever we can.