Going Dutch this Season

November 29th, 2010

I have always been intrigued by the Dutch concept of sharing, equality, pairs, and twosomes. I even did a photo essay about them a while back called Curious Couples. But the concept of ‘Going Dutch’ took on an expanded meaning for me while listening to Bikes Belong spokesperson Zach Vanderkooy.   Zach and I were panelists… Read more »

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I have always been intrigued by the Dutch concept of sharing, equality, pairs, and twosomes. I even did a photo essay about them a while back called Curious Couples. But the concept of ‘Going Dutch’ took on an expanded meaning for me while listening to Bikes Belong spokesperson Zach Vanderkooy.   Zach and I were panelists at a symposium for Dutch Design Week in San Francisco called Seeing Orange.   Biking is wildly popular with all age groups in Holland. Zach explained why and how this came to be.

It turns out that biking in Holland is designed to be as much about fun as it is about efficiency. The sharing and social part of riding is actually built into the urban infrastructure.  For example, whenever possible, bike lanes are made wide enough for people to ride two abreast, rather than in single file. This way people can talk and share the ride together – another expansion of the meaning of ‘going Dutch’.

It makes perfect sense.  Imagine if we were forced to use single file sidewalks – a line of alienated human units proceeding along.  Boring, awkward, even a little nightmarish.  Walking can often be as much about conversation as mobility. And walking deserves wider sidewalks that make interaction possible. And the same should be true of biking.  We all prefer to ride with friends and for social reasons (unless we’re just hustling to get someplace or out purely for exercise). But we tend to value bikes more for the independence they give us, and less for their potential to connect us socially.

So now we’re really dreaming: building bike lanes in the US wide enough for two people? This may seem farfetched when many cities have trouble getting approval for any type of bike lane. But in reality, some strides are being made. In fact you can already see examples of doublewide lanes in Manhattan and in other cities in the US. We can learn from the Dutch – they ask us to look at the world a little different. It may be easier for them to think outside the box: they have cities built around canals and clogs made of wood.

We’re going Dutch this Season: 10% off Pairs

Visualize a Pair of Bikes for the Holidays


Buy any two bikes on one order for us this season, and we’ll give you 10% discount on both bikes.   Our new Ready to Ride home delivery option makes this gift option feasible for anyone. Bikes arrive 99% assembled. This offer is valid through Dec 15th. Visualize a pair of bikes for the holidays. (You may want to take this possibility into account when deciding on the size of this year’s tree). Just make the order online and we’ll take 10% off on both bikes after your order – or call us to make your order if you prefer.


Danish Yakkay Helmets $175



Yakkay Cambridge Complete Helmet – $175

Yes – you can actually look stylish in a helmet. Yakkay helmets, designed in Denmark, have taken Europe by storm in the past two years, and we are pleased to introduce them to the US market this season.  They are the first helmets to meet our strict safety standards and our needs for a helmet with the fashionable appearance of a good-looking cap.

Andreja Premium Espresso Machine

November 23rd, 2010

Formidable looks. Efficient Function. Just like a PUBLIC Bike. Why is a bike company selling an espresso machine? Caffeine, for better or worse, has a history of fueling bicyclists. So no surprise that many bicyclists are just as fussy about coffee as they are about bikes. We found a machine that will please many of you…. Read more »

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Andreja Premium Espresso Machine Detail shot Cappuccino Warehouse Sale Espresso

Formidable looks. Efficient Function. Just like a PUBLIC Bike.

Why is a bike company selling an espresso machine? Caffeine, for better or worse, has a history of fueling bicyclists. So no surprise that many bicyclists are just as fussy about coffee as they are about bikes. We found a machine that will please many of you. Actually, the Andreja Espresso Machine and our bikes share quite a bit in common. They both combine form and function elegantly. They are both hard-working pieces of equipment, easy on the eyes, and uncomplicated to use.

I know about espresso machines. My first one was a Faema and dates back to the 70s. Since then I have owned a wide range of machines, all in pursuit of the home espresso machine that makes espresso as good as a cafe. There are many home espresso machines, but few have the power of a commercial machine with the safety and practicality for home use.

I came across the Andreja in the kitchen of Scot Nichol two years ago. Scot, the founder of IBIS bicycle, is a bit of a legend in the hard-core mountain biking world. He has built a lot of great bikes, and he knows a lot about good mechanics. He told me that the Andreja was the best machine he had ever used. This coming from a guy who does not use the word “best” lightly quickly convinced me to buy one. Scot, to no surprise, was right. The Andreja qualifies as the best home machine I have ever used. I’ve had mine for two years and swear by it. This is the reason we are featuring the Andreja Espresso Machine this season.

The Andreja is not for people who prefer to push buttons and have an automated coffee making experience. It is for people who like the satisfying feel of manual operations executed at a high level of efficiency and quality. Super easy to use, fast, quiet, and safe. You get the enjoyable ritual of filing up the holder, tamping it down to your preferred espresso strength, and steaming the milk to your preferred foam density. The Andreja is a pleasure to use and rewards you with coffee as good as it gets.  While it is designed for home usage, it also serves large groups of people. We set up the espresso machine at our Warehouse Sale last Saturday and kept our customers standing in line caffeinated.

The specifications comprise an impressive list, and we have them listed on our website. Like our bikes, you can come by our South Park office and test the Andreja yourself, or purchase one from us online knowing that we guarantee that all of our products meet your satisfaction or we’ll cheerfully take a return.

Our PUBLIC Contest Winners

November 23rd, 2010

We had a tough time choosing the winners of our PUBLIC Contest for a new PUBLIC J7 or PUBLIC A7 among so many impressive, thoughtful, and creative entries. We received entries from all over the country from Muscle Shoals, AL to Sarasota, FL to Flat Rock, MI. We had both a contest for university students… Read more »

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We had a tough time choosing the winners of our PUBLIC Contest for a new PUBLIC J7 or PUBLIC A7 among so many impressive, thoughtful, and creative entries. We received entries from all over the country from Muscle Shoals, AL to Sarasota, FL to Flat Rock, MI.

We had both a contest for university students and a general contest for everyone else. And we even decided to give away a third PUBLIC bike to a student from UC Berkeley where we received the most university entries. Our Grand Prize winners all received new PUBLIC bikes and the second prize winners received PUBLIC accessories and gear.

Here are our PUBLIC Contest winners (read the winning submissions below):

Grand Prize PUBLIC Contest Winner

Mark Schafer
Knoxville, Tennessee

Grand Prize University Contest Winners

Marieke Van Damme
Boston University
Boston, Massachusetts

Michal Kapitulnik
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, California

Second Prize Contest Winners

Kate Woodrow
Berkeley, California

Sandra Edwards
New York, New York

Karen Krutch
Florence, Alabama

Heidi Easudes
Phoenix, Arizona

Stephanie Holder
Oakland, California

Leslie Bloom
San Luis Obispo, Calfornia

David Kwan
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Matt Wholey
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Hannah Halliday
State College, Pennsylvania

Mary Hosch
Convington, Louisiana

Grand Prize Winning Submissions

Mark Schafer
Knoxville, TN

Please view the illustrated version of my entry.

A 90-Minute Bicycle Trip in Knoxville, Tennessee
–Starring PUBLIC and Me–

Stop #1
MY HOUSE
We would begin our ride west of town at my house, traveling on roads and PUBLIC greenways towards Downtown.

Stop #2
NEYLAND STADIUM
Home of the Tennessee Vols. It is here that you would discover why you should open a bike shop in Knoxville selling only your orange bikes!

Stop #3
THE SUNSPHERE
No, it’s not actually a wig shop as shown on the Simpsons, but it’s the define mark of the Knoxville skyline and features a great view of the city!

Stop #4
RACHMANINOFF STATUE
A bit random, but this cool monument memorializes the great pianist’s last PUBLIC concert! (it was in Knoxville)

Stop #5
MARKET SQUARE
Perhaps Knoxville’s best PUBLIC space, this is where our bike ride would end with an energizing meal from the farmers’ market or a great local eatery like the Tomato Head. Over lunch, we’d discuss…

MY QUESTIONS ABOUT BIKES & BIKING
Question #1
How do you encourage bike riding when things where you live are pretty far apart?

Question #2
To transform my commute, is my only option to sell my house, move, and get a new job?

Question #3
What would you suggest to improve biking in Knoxville?

I would then say, “Thank you” for taking a bike ride in my city.

THE END

Marieke Van Damme
Boston University
Boston, Massachusetts

(Note! From “A” to “Z”):

Ahoy! Boston’s a great town to explore by PUBLIC bicycle. Climb on with me at Boston University. Down we go. Esplanade first. Fenway coming up. Great place to grab a bite, this place called Lower Depths. Hot dogs for a dollar. I like mine with mac and cheese. Just in time to beat the campus rush.

Kenmore’s the name of this area. Lansdowne Street is our way out of here, where all the home run balls fall. Mothers Rest marks the start of a lovely string of parks with a pleasant bike path. Now we head uphill, so change gears. On past the Museum of Fine Arts. Pedal! Quixotic this trip is not.

Round the Riverway, where our tires send acorns somersaulting. Soon we plateau at a pond where boats wobble in the breeze. The path around is nice, but no biking allowed. Used to be able to swim here, too. Veer with me instead onto the street where my apartment is.

Xerxes once halted his army for a week to admire a sycamore. You and I can’t do that, we’ve got studying to do. Zoom back downhill when you’re done; I’ll bike in tomorrow.

Michal Kapitulnik
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, California

left, left, straight. stop. look under your left shoe. right, straight. right, hang right, stop. look straight ahead. left, left, straight. stop. right, veer left, straight, stop. look to your left. straight, 2nd right, straight, stop. look over your right shoulder. straight, right, right, third left, stop. snacks. straight (riding more slowly) third right, stop. nap.

Denim, Cotton, + Steel

November 17th, 2010

PUBLIC Pop-Up Shop at Gap for the Holidays It’s no secret that the way we shop for stuff has radically changed.  Credit (or blame) the web for most of the changes, but the fact is we can now shop for almost anything, anytime, anywhere in the world.  Digital colossi like Amazon, Craigslist, and Groupon are… Read more »

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PUBLIC Pop-Up Shop at Gap for the HolidaysPUBLIC Pop-Up Shop at Gap for the Holidays PUBLIC Pop-Up Shop at Gap for the Holidays PUBLIC Pop-Up Shop at Gap for the HolidaysPUBLIC Pop-Up Shop at Gap for the Holidays

PUBLIC Pop-Up Shop at Gap for the Holidays

It’s no secret that the way we shop for stuff has radically changed.  Credit (or blame) the web for most of the changes, but the fact is we can now shop for almost anything, anytime, anywhere in the world.  Digital colossi like Amazon, Craigslist, and Groupon are a part of everyday life now.  Etsy allows us to buy hand made one-of-a-kind goods with a click.  Even as virtual shopping has become mainstream, there has been a bit of a renaissance in the other direction.  Farmers’ Markets are everywhere. Local crafts fairs and street vendors are back in fashion.  Every week there’s another lunch wagon pulling in our neighborhood offering some seriously non-digital street food. The last few years have brought wholesale changes to retail.

So it is fitting – as well as flattering – that the Gap approached us last month about putting a PUBLIC pop-up shop in their flagship store on Market Street in San Francisco. Voila.  It is up and running as of last Saturday.  If you are in the Bay Area, please come down and visit.  As you would expect from a leading apparel retailer, the Gap has created beautiful visual displays of our bikes and gear.  Even adding some special touches like iPads imbedded in the desks for ordering our products online.  They have faithfully recreated our South Park vibe on the busiest street corner in San Francisco, all the way down to our low-tech sandwich boards on the sidewalk.  From the second floor bay windows you can watch the flow of bicyclists riding down Market Street.  It feels good, and we love being there. You can visit everyday until 9PM. Please drop by the Gap store on 890 Market near Powell St. next to the cable car turnaround.

Building partnerships and bending the rules are not new to the Gap. In 2008 they created a Colette concept store in New York. So partnering with a local company like ours is consistent with the Gap’s roots. In 1969, they began as a single store in San Francisco selling a range of local products – primarily Vinyl LPs and Levi’s. They were quirky, gutsy, and very locally minded. High quality, casual, and affordable clothing, just the kind of stuff that goes with our everyday bikes, has always been their focus. We greatly appreciate the opportunity to get our bikes – and our mission – out in front of the broader public. So thanks to Gap. We would love our steel bikes to be as popular and ubiquitous as the Gap has made denim jeans and cotton tees.

 

New $495 bikes now in stock

The new A7 and J7Our first shipments of our PUBLIC A7 and PUBLIC J7 bikes are arriving this week. These models were designed specifically to make a quality steel frame bikes as affordable as possible.  They look great and like all of our bikes, ride like butter. And now we have a special home delivery option. They can be shipped anywhere in the US. They’re kind of a perfect holiday gift, no?  Who wouldn’t want to feel like a kid again and get a bike for the holidays?

Ready to Ride home delivery for the Holidays

Ready To Ride BoxWith Ready to Ride, the bicycle is shipped directly by FedEx to your home or office and arrives within 7-10 business days, depending on where you live. We build the bike for you 99% assembled with the wheels in place. All you need to do is unwrap the bike, complete a few simple assembly steps, and be riding in 20 minutes.

Warehouse Sale this Saturday

We’re holding a Warehouse Sale on November 20th, from 11 – 4, to make room for our new PUBLIC bikes.  The Warehouse Sale at 2125 Harrison Street (at Mariposa) will include, but is not limited to, discounted seasonal inventory, over a dozen PUBLIC bikes with slight blemishes, and vintage bikes from our personal collections. We will have all our bikes available for test riding and purchase at our Warehouse Sale.

 

Creative Growth Art Gallery at PUBLIC

November 16th, 2010

“Creative Growth is an extraordinary place, the gold standard of institutions of its kind.” – Raw Vision Magazine We are pleased to offer a selection of artwork this season from Creative Growth based in Oakland, CA. What is the connection of biking company to a local art gallery? Easy. Creative Growth’s inspiring environment provides a place… Read more »

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Erin Punzel, Large Tower

Donald Mitchell, Abstract Figures

Dan Miller, Black and White

Andrea Kildare, Abstract Colors

“Creative Growth is an extraordinary place, the gold standard of institutions of its kind.”
– Raw Vision Magazine

We are pleased to offer a selection of artwork this season from Creative Growth based in Oakland, CA. What is the connection of biking company to a local art gallery? Easy. Creative Growth’s inspiring environment provides a place for urban adults with developmental, mental, and physical disabilities to express themselves creatively. This aligns with PUBLIC’s mission to serve as an all-inclusive hub for discovering ways to think a little more imaginatively about community, transportation, and everyday design. Bikes are all about facilitating our connection and engagement with our neighborhoods and communities. And with enough support all of these things can positively impact our daily lives. We like to support as many local groups whenever possible, and Creative Growth is our choice this season.

I was introduced to Creative Growth almost ten years ago by some New York fashionistas. That may seem odd given that New York has its own share of cool gallery and community centers. But Creative Growth is unique in its longevity, reach, and in the quality of its artwork. Its international reputation stands in direct contrast to its humble location and modest demeanor. Its frequent exhibitions gain support from musicians like David Byrne, food gurus like Alice Waters, designers like Yves Behar, and everyone in between. They all pitch in to help this community of artists who come to Creative Growth for support, esteem, and a connection to the larger world.

You can read more about Creative Growth on their website, become a member online, follow them on Facebook, or visit our San Francisco headquarters to view the rotating exhibition.  But the best option is to buy a piece of artwork for yourself or a friend for the holidays. All proceeds from the sale of this artwork will be given to the gallery.

Rob Forbes

The special collection of 16 original works on paper are mounted and framed with a basic white frame.

Artists included: Andrea Kildare, Charles Esseltine, Dan Miller, Dinah Shapiro, Donald Mitchell, Erin Punzel, John Hiltunen, Kerry Daminakes, Maria Bustillos, Paulino Martin, Ray Vickers, Varlier Tribble

 

Chic Shoes by Martha Davis

November 1st, 2010

We are offering some exceptional footwear this fall from local shoe designer, Martha Davis. Normally Martha Davis’s shoes are found in upscale shoe stores, like Gimme Shoes in San Francisco, and other chic boutiques around the world, not bike stores. But we think her shoes and our bikes go especially well together – structured yet… Read more »

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Martha Davis Low Lace Boot Martha Davis Low Lace Boot - Gold

We are offering some exceptional footwear this fall from local shoe designer, Martha Davis. Normally Martha Davis’s shoes are found in upscale shoe stores, like Gimme Shoes in San Francisco, and other chic boutiques around the world, not bike stores. But we think her shoes and our bikes go especially well together – structured yet sexy, functional but fun.

They have a lace up back seam detail, leather sole, and 2″ wood heel. Bench made in Italy. You can actually wear heels, pumps, boots, or any type of shoes on our bikes. If you’re going to a dressy event in the city for example, it often means you do not want to walk down into a subway or to scuff your heels walking.